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Hazardous substances in Europe’s fresh and marine waters – an overview

Hazardous substances in fresh and marine water can harm aquatic life and pose a risk to human health, according to a new report published today by the European Environment Agency (EEA). The report notes that while European legislation to address the issue is relatively strong, new challenges exist including ‘emerging pollutants’ where potential effects are not yet fully understood. More effort is also needed to ensure that chemicals are produced and used more sustainably.

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Europe successfully phasing out known ozone layer-harming chemicals

Chemicals which damage the ozone layer continue to be phased out in the European Union, according to the latest data from the European Environment Agency (EEA).

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Europe using less ozone-damaging chemicals

Europe has made significant progress in phasing out chemicals which damage the ozone layer, according to a report from the European Environment Agency (EEA). The report considers production and use of more than 200 chemicals which damage the planet’s ozone layer, which are controlled by the Montreal Protocol and EU legislation.

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Europe’s environment now healthier – but new risks emerging

Europeans live longer and healthier lives than in the past, partly due to successful environmental policies that have reduced the exposure to harmful environmental contaminants in air, water and food, according to a new report. However, these contaminants are still a problem, and several new health risks are emerging, for example, from new chemicals, new products and changing lifestyle patterns.

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Europe continues to phase out ozone layer-damaging chemicals

Europe continues to make progress in phasing out chemicals which damage the ozone layer according to a new report from the European Environment Agency (EEA). The report considers the use of more than 200 chemicals controlled by the Montreal Protocol and EU legislation.

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Increase in cancers and fertility problems may be caused by household chemicals and pharmaceuticals

Chemicals which disrupt the hormone system – also known as 'endocrine disrupting chemicals' (EDCs) – may be a contributing factor behind the significant increases in cancers, diabetes and obesity, falling fertility, and an increased number of neurological development problems in both humans and animals, according to a review of recent scientific literature commissioned by the European Environment Agency (EEA).

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EEA reviews new findings from 2012, the Year of Water

Europe needs to work harder to protect its water resources from increasing pressures. This was one of the messages that emerged during 2012, ‘European Year of Water’. The European Environment Agency (EEA) also presented important findings in many other areas, including air, climate, biodiversity and chemicals.

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The cost of ignoring the warning signs - EEA publishes ‘Late Lessons from Early Warnings, volume II’

New technologies have sometimes had very harmful effects, but in many cases the early warning signs have been suppressed or ignored. The second volume of Late Lessons from Early Warnings investigates specific cases where danger signals have gone unheeded, in some cases leading to deaths, illness and environmental destruction.

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More action needed to tackle mixtures of chemicals in Europe's waters

Despite successes in addressing some of the most hazardous chemicals, more attention is needed to address the danger posed by the 'cocktail effect' of lower concentrations of chemicals in European lakes, rivers and other surface water bodies, according to a European Environment Agency (EEA) report released today.

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Progress reducing emissions of some air pollutants

Emissions of sulphur (SOx) have been reduced by almost 70 % since 1990, says a new report recently released by the European Environment Agency (EEA). The report, 'Annual European Community LRTAP Convention emission inventory report 1990–2005' also shows that levels of nitrogen oxides (NOx), as reported by the EU-27 Member States, are down by 35 %.

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Neonicotinoid pesticides are a huge risk – so ban is welcome, says EEA

The European Commission has decided to ban three neonicotinoid insecticides. These chemicals can harm honeybees, according to a large body of scientific evidence, so the European Environment Agency (EEA) commends the precautionary decision to ban them.

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