Multimedia

Videos about climate change mitigation

Album Art:
Video Album Art

Spotting the signs for a transport system by 2050

Transport, including international aviation and maritime transport, accounts for around a quarter of total EU greenhouse gas emissions. Based on analysis of long-term trends, a new European Environment Agency report calls for a clear vision defining Europe's transport system by 2050 and consistent policies to achieve it.   More

Album Art:
Video Album Art

One degree matters

'One degree matters' follows social and business leaders as they travel to Greenland and experience for themselves the dramatic effects of the melting of the ice cap and come to understand the planetary effects of climate change and the impacts these will have on society and the economy. The film brings to the screen the latest science from the Arctic and shows why a further rise in global temperature of one degree matters for the future of humankind.   More

Album Art:
Video Album Art

COP 15, the future decided now

The climate meeting in Copenhagen in December 2009 is a crucial step in a process dating back to 1992 and the UN's 'Earth Summit' in Rio de Janeiro. Called 'COP15' for short, it will be the most important global climate change meeting ever.   More

Album Art:
Video Album Art

Climate change — time to act

Climate change is a real and current threat. To avoid major irreversible impacts on society and ecosystems, we must act now.   More

Album Art:
Video Album Art

Ecodriving, a cleaner and cheaper solution

These few simple, practical and free reflexes can be adopted by all drivers. With climate change increasingly in the news and oil prices hitting ever higher records, EcoDriving not only offers the advantage of reducing emissions, but also gives consumers the opportunity to cut their fuel costs by 15 % to 30 %.   More

Album Art:
Video Album Art

Global warning: early warnings on adaptation

Climate change is the ever growing reality faced by the inhabitants of the Arctic regions. They must adapt to the changing landscapes, increasing temperatures, disappearing species, new hunting techniques. In this video, several leaders of indigenous peoples' organizations, represented in the Arctic Council, share their thoughts and concerns about the changes in their lifestyles brought on by the changing climate.   More

Album Art:
Video Album Art

Living with Climate change

Global warming is happening. Temperatures have already risen by 0.76 degrees since the industrial revolution and are projected to rise further by 1.8 - 4 degrees by the end of the century. The last time climate change happened at this pace was 125,000 years ago and led to a 4-6 metre sea level rise. Global warming at the upper end of the scale predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change would have catastrophic consequences for Europe. Up to 30% of plant, animal and bird species would be wiped out and the threat of natural disasters such as landslides, floods and mudslides would increase significantly.   More

Album Art:
Video Album Art

Emissions trading - putting a price on carbon

The EU Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) is a world first and a major weapon in Europe's fight against climate change. The innovative system has turned carbon dioxide emissions into a tradeable commodity. They can now be bought and sold like any other of the thousands of products traded on world markets today. The scheme works by placing a limit or a 'cap' on the amount of carbon dioxide participating installations - currently around 10,500 across the European Union - can emit every year. If an installation emits more than its allowance, it must either pay a very hefty fine or buy surplus allowances from companies that have managed to stay below their limit. The system ensures that overall CO2 emissions from the plants covered are cut in the most cost effective way.   More

Album Art:
Video Album Art

Capturing Carbon: A new front in the fight against climate change

Global warming is one of the biggest issues of our time. To meet the targets set for reducing CO2 emissions, it's widely accepted that new technology will play an important role, sometimes as a "bridging technology", while alternative sustainable energy sources are being developed. One of the most promising technologies is Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS). This a means of capturing CO2 from sources such as power plants, compressing the CO2 and storing it away safely in geological formations underground or under the seabed instead of releasing it into the atmosphere.   More

Album Art:
Video Album Art

Curbing CO2 emissions from road transport

Road transport generates about one fifth of the EU's CO2 emissions, with passenger cars responsible for around 12%. This makes it the second most important source of greenhouse gases. Although there have been significant improvements over recent years in vehicle technology, these have not been enough to neutralise the effect of increases in traffic and car size.   More

Album Art:
Video Album Art

Reducing climate impacts from international aviation: Europe leads the way

The European Commission is proposing legislation to bring the aviation sector into the European Union's pioneering emissions trading scheme (EU ETS) in order to control the rapid growth in CO2 emissions from air travel. Until now airlines have not been subject to the constraints on energy consumption or greenhouse gas emissions that other businesses have to live with. Emissions from domestic flights are covered by the Kyoto Protocol's emission targets for developed countries, but international aviation - which makes up the vast majority of flights - is not. In addition, jet fuel for international flights has historically been exempted from taxation. Hence the need for policy action.   More

Album Art:
Video Album Art

Europe leads the fight against climate change

The Earth is rapidly getting warmer, threatening serious and even catastrophic disruption to our societies and to the natural environment on which we depend. Over the course of the 20th century the average temperature increased by around 0.6 C globally, by almost 1 C in Europe and by no less than 5 C in the Arctic. This man-made warming is already having many disruptive effects around the globe. Sea levels are rising as a result of melting glaciers and ice sheets, threatening to flood low-lying communities. Extreme weather conditions; floods, droughts, storms are becoming more severe, more frequent and more costly in some parts of the world. And many endangered species may be pushed to extinction over the coming decades as climate change affects their traditional habitats.   More

Album Art:
Video Album Art

Water and hydroelectric power

Although hydroelectric power stations create power from a reusable resource, there are some concerns about their impact on water. They alter the flow and temperature regimes that destroy fish spawning areas, handicap fish migration, kill fish in turbines and dry out wetlands. They can also capture sediment and nutrients behind dams, which can reduce the fertility of the waters downstream and may also increase erosion of river banks. For instance dams have reduced the sediment carried into Lake Geneva by some 50 %. Climate change could also make many hydroelectric power plants less reliable in future as water availability changes. While some plants in northern Europe could generate more power, hydroelectric dams in Bulgaria, Portugal, Spain, Turkey and Ukraine could reduce output by 20-50 % because of declining rainfall. Source: State of the Environment Report No 1/2005 "The European environment - State and outlook 2005" (published 29 Nov 2005)   More

Album Art:
Video Album Art

Carbon uptake by forests

(This video has no audio.) The uptake of carbon from the atmosphere by natural vegetation, soils, forests and agricultural land ('terrestrial biosphere') is an important part of the carbon cycle. Carbon uptake by vegetation can lessen the increasing concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere and in Europe can be increased by planting forests and other land management measures. But the additional potential storage capacity for the EU in forestry and agriculture is estimated to be relatively small, and climate change may cause more fires, pests and storm damage as well as increasing water stress, particularly in the Mediterranean area. These conditions would curtail plant growth and reduce the amount of carbon stored in the biosphere. Source: EEA Report No 2/2004 "Impacts of Europe's changing climate" (published 18 Aug 2004)   More

Album Art:
Video Album Art

Effects of climate change

In the past 100 years, the number of cold and frost days has decreased in most parts of Europe, whereas the number of days with temperatures above 25°C and the number of heatwaves have increased. The frequency of very wet days has significantly decreased in recent decades in many places in southern Europe, but increased in mid and northern Europe. Cold winters are projected to disappear almost entirely by 2080 and hot summers are projected to become much more frequent. This will have a continuing effect on mountain regions. For every 1°C increase in temperature, the snowline rises by 150 metres. And by 2050, three-quarters of today's glaciers in parts of the Alps are expected to have disappeared. Source: State of the Environment Report No 1/2005 "The European environment - State and outlook 2005" (published 29 Nov 2005)   More

Album Art:
Video Album Art

Ozone: fluctuations over 15 years

This video shows the projected difference in the 'ozone hole' over the arctic between the year 2000 and 2015. Source: Animation form 'Global animations'   More

European Environment Agency (EEA)
Kongens Nytorv 6
1050 Copenhagen K
Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100