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Climate change mitigation

Climate change is one of the biggest challenges of our times

Climate change is already happening: temperatures are rising, drought and wild fires are starting to occur more frequently, rainfall patterns are shifting, glaciers and snow are melting and the global mean sea level is rising. To mitigate climate change, we must reduce or prevent the emissions linked to human activities.

National policies and measures on climate change mitigation in Europe

How many policies and measures (PaMs) did the European Member States implement or plan to implement to reduce greenhouse gas emissions? What type of policies, affecting which sectors have been primarily reported? Were the European Union policies driving the development of national policies? The European Environment Agency's viewer explores PaMs reported by Member States under the EU Monitoring Mechanism Regulation.

The European Environment Agency’s (EEA) preliminary data on the European Union’s (EU) greenhouse gas emissions in 2019 show close to a 4 % decrease, compared with 2018. The only time EU emissions decreased more since 1990 was during to the economic crisis in 2009. In addition, new EEA data for 2019 show that EU stays on track to end the use of chemicals harming the ozone layer.

Emissions of the five most harmful air pollutants, including particulate matter (PM), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and ammonia (NH3) reduced across the European Union between 2017 and 2018 according to updated data published today by the European Environment Agency (EEA). The data is from the annual EU emission inventory report sent to the UNECE Air Convention (Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution - CLRTAP).

Improving efficiency and reuse of materials to construct houses and other buildings can open significant new opportunities to further reducing greenhouse gas emissions, according to a European Environment Agency (EEA) briefing released today.

Published: 18 Sep 2020

Man-made ozone-depleting substances destroy the protective ozone layer and the international community established the Montreal Protocol in 1987 to cut their consumption and production. To fulfil its obligations under the Montreal Protocol, the EU has adopted the more ambitious EU Ozone Regulation. This briefing contains information on ozone-depleting substances in the EU, based on aggregated data reported by companies since 2006 under the Ozone Regulation.

Published: 09 Jul 2020

Together, European countries have reduced their greenhouse gas emissions significantly since 1990. Achieving climate neutrality by 2050, however, will demand additional and long-lasting climate mitigation strategies. With materials management accounting for up to two thirds of global greenhouse gas emissions, one promising area for further reductions is the circular economy. A new methodological approach helps to identify circular efforts that can contribute to reducing emissions in any sector and has highlighted key ways to cut emissions in the buildings sector.

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