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You are here: Home / Environmental topics / Climate change / Multimedia

Multimedia

All multimedia about climate change

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Cross boarder nature: Environmental Atlas of Europe — Germany France

In Eastern France and Western Germany you find 3000km2 of a biosphere reserve called “Les Vosges du Nord - Pfälzerwald” and it is the largest uninterrupted forest area in Western Europe.   More

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Melting Arctic: Environmental Atlas of Europe — Greenland

Last year alone there were 50 more melting days on the Greenland ice sheet than on average, meaning we now see an average net loss of ice mass of 200 gigatons per year - a level that is four times higher than just back in the year 2000.   More

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Food – adapting to change by sharing information

Food. We all need it. But most of us take it for granted. A changing climate brings with it a destabilizing effect on food crop production. With the pressure on food resources, we need to look at new solutions. We need to bring people, their stories and data together.   More

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Mission Greenland – For a Cleaner Future

For the first time the waste in Greenland has been analyzed and the result is alarming. All households and industries need to get better at separating their waste. It’s a crucial mission and everyone needs to be involved, if Greenland is to have a cleaner and greener future.   More

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Our arctic challenge

Jacqueline McGlade, Executive Director of the European Environment Agency (EEA), and three of her colleagues have chosen to be part of an extraordinary journey in East Greenland. They travel from their offices in Copenhagen to participate in a multi sport race, where they challenge themselves through 250 kilometers of the Arctic wilderness. On their way they encounter the effects of climate change and its impact on the Arctic environment. The Inuit are among the first people to experience the effects of climate change. They are in the middle of an environmental challenge that will change many parts of their culture. What is happening to the Inuit today will happen to the rest of the world tomorrow. We will all need to adapt to climate change.   More

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A day in my forest: Environmental Atlas of Europe — Poland

Silent except for the humming of bees and the distant hammering of woodpeckers, Białowieża Forest is a fairytale landscape of tall trees, peat bogs and meadows – home to innumerable species of birds, invertebrates, lichens, fungi and other flora and fauna including grey wolves, lynx, elk and a large herd of rare European bison.   More

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City of five seas: Environmental Atlas of Europe — Russia

Nizhny Novgorod has a population of 1.3 million and is one of Russia's most important industrial cities. Its process manufacturing plants are heavily reliant on water, supplied from the Volga River and one of its tributaries, the Oka. The region's drinking water also comes from the Upper Volga Basin.   More

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Floating cities: Environmental Atlas of Europe - The Netherlands

Almost a third of the Netherlands lies below sea level, and over the centuries the country has developed a highly efficient flood-defence system. The tragic floods of 1953, caused by a storm surge and exceptionally spring tides, led to a range of modern-day engineering solutions as well as a heightened awareness in Dutch society of the dangers of sea level rise. But when, in the mid 1990s, unusually heavy rain in Belgium and Germany caused the Rhine and the Meuse to breach their banks and hundreds of thousands of people had to be evacuated, it was clear that long-term action would have to be taken to protect against flooding from river water as well. The government has now launched a wide ranging programme of adaptation schemes to protect the coasts from sea-level and to create 'Room for the River', by establishing unobstructed spaces into which the major rivers can safely over-flow.   More

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Carbon farmers: Environmental Atlas of Europe — Italy

The family run Fattoria La Vialla in Tuscany is a shining example of truly sustainable farm-ing. Every element of the production chain, from preparing the soil through to packaging the produce, has been planned with the environment in mind.   More

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Windbreaks: Environmental Atlas of Europe - Georgia

During the Soviet era, Dedoplistskaro in south east Georgia was the country’s main production area for wheat and sunflower seeds. That came to an end in 1991 when Georgia became independent and Russia cut off its energy supply. To survive the cold winters, the people resorted to cutting down trees for firewood, stripping the countryside of the windbreaks that protected the crops and soil from the harsh desert winds and provided a natural habitat for many species of animals and plants.   More

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Power to the people: Environmental Atlas of Europe — Denmark

Thisted in north west Jutland is the most climate-friendly municipality in Denmark. Since the early 1980s, they've been using a creative mix of sustainable energy sources to provide heating and power for their 46,000 residents. In recognition of their contribution to renewable energy they were awarded the European Solar Prize in 2007.   More

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Rain on snow: Environmental Atlas of Europe — Sweden

"The reindeer herder has learned to accept the good and the bad part of nature and always to adapt." Niklas Labba, reindeer herder, Finland. About 70,000 Sami live in the Arctic regions of Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia. Originally they hunted reindeer, but since the 17th century they have practised herding as a form of agricultural meat production, passing their knowledge and skills down through the generations.   More

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Ice road: Environmental Atlas of Europe - Finland

If you want to go to the island of Hailuoto in the Gulf of Bothnia during winter, it’s faster to take the 8 km ice road rather than go by ferry. But the ice has to reach 70 cm in thickness before it’s safe enough to drive over.   More

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Ecovillage: Environmental Atlas of Europe - Ireland

Ten years ago, a group of people in Ireland came together to try to reduce their overall carbon footprint by building an ecological community. They looked at how they could incor-porate sustainability into every aspect of their lives – how they could build and power their houses, how they could earn their living, how they could travel and grow their food.   More

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Spotting the signs for a transport system by 2050

Transport, including international aviation and maritime transport, accounts for around a quarter of total EU greenhouse gas emissions. Based on analysis of long-term trends, a new European Environment Agency report calls for a clear vision defining Europe's transport system by 2050 and consistent policies to achieve it.   More

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How does the emission trading scheme work?

Emission trading scheme? Cap and trade? What do these words mean? And how does it all contribute to reduced emissions of greenhouse gases? This animation shows how the scheme works.   More

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One degree matters

'One degree matters' follows social and business leaders as they travel to Greenland and experience for themselves the dramatic effects of the melting of the ice cap and come to understand the planetary effects of climate change and the impacts these will have on society and the economy. The film brings to the screen the latest science from the Arctic and shows why a further rise in global temperature of one degree matters for the future of humankind.   More

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Bending the trend

On Tuesday 8 December, Antoine Le Menestrel performed a thrilling dramatic ascent of the facades of the EEA and the French Embassy at Kongens Nytorv, Copenhagen. The French climber and his company, Lézards Bleus, used the monumental architecture, music and light to draw the public's attention to the urgent need to tackle climate change.   More

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COP 15, the future decided now

The climate meeting in Copenhagen in December 2009 is a crucial step in a process dating back to 1992 and the UN's 'Earth Summit' in Rio de Janeiro. Called 'COP15' for short, it will be the most important global climate change meeting ever.   More

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Climate change — time to act

Climate change is a real and current threat. To avoid major irreversible impacts on society and ecosystems, we must act now.   More

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