Multimedia

All multimedia about climate change

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Hans Bruyninckx — Climate change adaptation in cities

Our climate is changing. Home to three quarters of European citizens, cities will need to adapt to a changing climate. Many innovative solutions are already being put to use. Find out what climate change means for cities in Europe and what cities can do.   More

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Are we ready for climate change?

We need to reduce global greenhouse-gas emissions substantially to avoid the worst impacts of climate change around the world and in Europe. The severity of climate change will depend on how much and how quickly we can cut greenhouse-gas emissions. We also need to adapt to our changing climate.   More

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Key provider of environmental knowledge in Europe

The EEA is the key knowledge provider on Europe’s environment for those involved in developing, adopting, implementing and evaluating environmental policy in Europe. Our task is to provide impartial, sound, timely and reliable data and knowledge on Europe’s environment.   More

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Where next for Europe's environment?

How can Europe become truly 'sustainable'? Here EEA Executive Director Hans Bruyninckx calls for a Europe-wide transition to a truly sustainable system, beyond the incremental gains in efficiency which have worked in the past. Moreover, Europe needs to make this kind of fundamental transition in its relationship to the environment if it is to meet its own objectives by mid century, he argues.   More

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Food – adapting to change by sharing information

Food. We all need it. But most of us take it for granted. A changing climate brings with it a destabilizing effect on food crop production. With the pressure on food resources, we need to look at new solutions. We need to bring people, their stories and data together.   More

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Our arctic challenge

Jacqueline McGlade, Executive Director of the European Environment Agency (EEA), and three of her colleagues have chosen to be part of an extraordinary journey in East Greenland. They travel from their offices in Copenhagen to participate in a multi sport race, where they challenge themselves through 250 kilometers of the Arctic wilderness. On their way they encounter the effects of climate change and its impact on the Arctic environment. The Inuit are among the first people to experience the effects of climate change. They are in the middle of an environmental challenge that will change many parts of their culture. What is happening to the Inuit today will happen to the rest of the world tomorrow. We will all need to adapt to climate change.   More

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Spotting the signs for a transport system by 2050

Transport, including international aviation and maritime transport, accounts for around a quarter of total EU greenhouse gas emissions. Based on analysis of long-term trends, a new European Environment Agency report calls for a clear vision defining Europe's transport system by 2050 and consistent policies to achieve it.   More

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How does the emission trading scheme work?

Emission trading scheme? Cap and trade? What do these words mean? And how does it all contribute to reduced emissions of greenhouse gases? This animation shows how the scheme works.   More

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One degree matters

'One degree matters' follows social and business leaders as they travel to Greenland and experience for themselves the dramatic effects of the melting of the ice cap and come to understand the planetary effects of climate change and the impacts these will have on society and the economy. The film brings to the screen the latest science from the Arctic and shows why a further rise in global temperature of one degree matters for the future of humankind.   More

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Bending the trend

On Tuesday 8 December, Antoine Le Menestrel performed a thrilling dramatic ascent of the facades of the EEA and the French Embassy at Kongens Nytorv, Copenhagen. The French climber and his company, Lézards Bleus, used the monumental architecture, music and light to draw the public's attention to the urgent need to tackle climate change.   More

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COP 15, the future decided now

The climate meeting in Copenhagen in December 2009 is a crucial step in a process dating back to 1992 and the UN's 'Earth Summit' in Rio de Janeiro. Called 'COP15' for short, it will be the most important global climate change meeting ever.   More

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Climate change — time to act

Climate change is a real and current threat. To avoid major irreversible impacts on society and ecosystems, we must act now.   More

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Climate change, adaptation is vital

Climate change is one of the biggest environmental, social and economic threats our planet currently faces. Profound changes are about to affect the mechanisms supporting life on earth, and their impact in the next few decades will be considerable.   More

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Ecodriving, a cleaner and cheaper solution

These few simple, practical and free reflexes can be adopted by all drivers. With climate change increasingly in the news and oil prices hitting ever higher records, EcoDriving not only offers the advantage of reducing emissions, but also gives consumers the opportunity to cut their fuel costs by 15 % to 30 %.   More

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Global warning: early warnings on adaptation

Climate change is the ever growing reality faced by the inhabitants of the Arctic regions. They must adapt to the changing landscapes, increasing temperatures, disappearing species, new hunting techniques. In this video, several leaders of indigenous peoples' organizations, represented in the Arctic Council, share their thoughts and concerns about the changes in their lifestyles brought on by the changing climate.   More

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Living with Climate change

Global warming is happening. Temperatures have already risen by 0.76 degrees since the industrial revolution and are projected to rise further by 1.8 - 4 degrees by the end of the century. The last time climate change happened at this pace was 125,000 years ago and led to a 4-6 metre sea level rise. Global warming at the upper end of the scale predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change would have catastrophic consequences for Europe. Up to 30% of plant, animal and bird species would be wiped out and the threat of natural disasters such as landslides, floods and mudslides would increase significantly.   More

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Emissions trading - putting a price on carbon

The EU Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) is a world first and a major weapon in Europe's fight against climate change. The innovative system has turned carbon dioxide emissions into a tradeable commodity. They can now be bought and sold like any other of the thousands of products traded on world markets today. The scheme works by placing a limit or a 'cap' on the amount of carbon dioxide participating installations - currently around 10,500 across the European Union - can emit every year. If an installation emits more than its allowance, it must either pay a very hefty fine or buy surplus allowances from companies that have managed to stay below their limit. The system ensures that overall CO2 emissions from the plants covered are cut in the most cost effective way.   More

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Capturing Carbon: A new front in the fight against climate change

Global warming is one of the biggest issues of our time. To meet the targets set for reducing CO2 emissions, it's widely accepted that new technology will play an important role, sometimes as a "bridging technology", while alternative sustainable energy sources are being developed. One of the most promising technologies is Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS). This a means of capturing CO2 from sources such as power plants, compressing the CO2 and storing it away safely in geological formations underground or under the seabed instead of releasing it into the atmosphere.   More

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Curbing CO2 emissions from road transport

Road transport generates about one fifth of the EU's CO2 emissions, with passenger cars responsible for around 12%. This makes it the second most important source of greenhouse gases. Although there have been significant improvements over recent years in vehicle technology, these have not been enough to neutralise the effect of increases in traffic and car size.   More

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Reducing climate impacts from international aviation: Europe leads the way

The European Commission is proposing legislation to bring the aviation sector into the European Union's pioneering emissions trading scheme (EU ETS) in order to control the rapid growth in CO2 emissions from air travel. Until now airlines have not been subject to the constraints on energy consumption or greenhouse gas emissions that other businesses have to live with. Emissions from domestic flights are covered by the Kyoto Protocol's emission targets for developed countries, but international aviation - which makes up the vast majority of flights - is not. In addition, jet fuel for international flights has historically been exempted from taxation. Hence the need for policy action.   More

European Environment Agency (EEA)
Kongens Nytorv 6
1050 Copenhagen K
Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100