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You are here: Home / Data and maps / Datasets / External datasets catalogue / NOBANIS - European Network on Invasive Alien Species

NOBANIS - European Network on Invasive Alien Species

External Data Reference
Regional portal on invasive alien species

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Indicators using this data

Invasive alien species in Europe Invasive alien species in Europe The indicator 'Invasive alien species in Europe' comprises two elements: 'Cumulative number of alien species in Europe since 1900', which shows trends in species that can potentially become invasive alien species, and 'Worst invasive alien species threatening biodiversity in Europe', a list of invasive species with demonstrated negative impacts. 1. 'Cumulative number of alien species in Europe since 1900' The cumulative number of alien species established in Europe from 1900 onwards is estimated in 10-year intervals. Pre-1900 introductions are also estimated. Information is broken down by major ecosystems (terrestrial, freshwater and marine) and selected 'taxonomic' groups: vertebrates, invertebrates, primary producers (vascular plants, bryophytes and algae) and fungi. 2. 'Worst invasive alien species threatening biodiversity in Europe' The list of worst invasive alien species threatening biodiversity in Europe distinguishes a number of the most harmful invasive alien species in Europe, across ecosystems and major taxonomic groups, with respect to their impacts upon European biodiversity and changing abundance or range. The list of worst invasive alien species threatening biodiversity in Europe covers the pan-European area. Two criteria were used to select species for the list: The species is recognized by experts (1) to have a serious adverse impact on biological diversity of Europe. The species, in addition to its adverse impact on biodiversity, may have negative consequences for human activities, health and/or economic interests. (1) Note: this recognition is based on expert view rather than quantifiable data and is therefore subject to debate. The reason for this is lack of quantitative data that lends itself to analysis and comparison among species.

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