Personal tools

next
previous
items

Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Sound and independent information
on the environment

You are here: Home / Data and maps / Datasets / National emissions reported to the UNFCCC and to the EU Greenhouse Gas Monitoring Mechanism

National emissions reported to the UNFCCC and to the EU Greenhouse Gas Monitoring Mechanism

Topics: ,
Data on greenhouse gas emissions and removals, sent by countries to UNFCCC and the EU Greenhouse Gas Monitoring Mechanism (EU Member States)

European data

National greenhouse gas inventories (IPCC Common Reporting Format sector classification)

[+] Show table definition (records:   394219)

Field name Field Definition Data type Primary key
Country_code International Country code (ISO 3166-1-Alpha-2 code elements) varchar(4) Yes
Pollutant_name Short name of pollutant varchar(40) Yes
Sector_code Sector code varchar(15) Yes
Year Year varchar(20) Yes
Country Country name varchar(53) No
Emissions Emission unit numeric(13) No
Format_name Name of guideline varchar(100) No
Notation Notation key varchar(40) No
Parent_sector_code Parent sector code varchar(15) No
Sector_name Sector name varchar(75) No
Unit Unit the measure value varchar(40) No

 

Additional information

Metadata

Additional information

Data compiled and held by ETC/ACC are annual emissions of CO2, CH4, N2O, HFCs, PFCs, SF6 from individual countries. Sectoral data (IPCC classification) is provided for the following main source categories: Energy, Industrial Processes, Solvent and Other Product Use, Agriculture, Land-Use Change and Forestry, Waste, Other, CO2 emissions from Biomass, International bunkers and Multilateral Operations.

 

Related content

Figures produced

Used in indicators

Energy efficiency and energy consumption in the transport sector Energy efficiency and energy consumption in the transport sector Energy efficiency progress (Figure 1) is measured from the ODEX indicator. This index aggregates the unit consumption trends for each transport mode in a single indicator for the whole sector. It is calculated at the level of 8 modes or vehicle types: cars, trucks, light vehicles, motorcycles, buses, total air transport, rail, and water transport. For cars, energy efficiency is measured by the specific consumption, expressed in litre/100km; for the transport of goods (trucks and light vehicles), the unit consumption per ton-km is used, as the main activity is to move goods; for other modes of transport various indicators of unit consumption are used, taking for each mode the most relevant indicator given the statistics available: toe/passenger for air, goe/pass-km for passenger rail, goe/ton-km for transport of goods by rail and water, toe per vehicle for motorcycles and buses.  The variation of the weighted index of the unit consumption by mode between t-1 and t is defined as follows It /It -1= 1/( It -1/It) with : energy share EC i  (consumption of each mode i   in total transport consumption); unit consumption index UC i (ratio : consumption related to traffic or specific consumption in l/100 km for cars); t refers the current year, t-1 to the previous year. The value at year t can be derived from the value at the previous year by reversing the calculation: It /It -1= 1/( It -1/It) ODEX is set at 100 for a reference year and successive values are then derived for each year t by the value of ODEX at year t-1 multiplied by It /It -1. The energy consumption variation of passenger transport in Figure 4 is broken down into 3 explanatory effects: activity effect (increase in traffic), modal shift effect (from private transport to public transport modes) and energy savings (change in specific consumption per unit of traffic). A positive “modal shift effect” means that the share of public passenger transport in passenger traffic is decreasing (shift from public transport to cars)  or the road in total freight traffic is increasing (shift from rail-water to road): this offsets energy savings. CO2 emissions for total transport are split into 2 explanatory effects (Figure 6): an activity effect due to an increase in traffic of passengers and freight, CO2 savings due to the reduction in the specific emissions of vehicles per unit of traffic.
Energy efficiency and energy consumption in the household sector Energy efficiency and energy consumption in the household sector Household energy consumption, covers all energy consumed in households for space heating, water heating, cooking and electricity.    Figures are reported either aggregated or disaggregated according to the end use categories named and as a total figure or per dwelling or m 2 of housing area. Climate fluctuates from one year to another. When the data is flagged as climate corrected, the data is normalized to reflect similar weather conditions. Consumption in useful energy per degree-day corrects for difference in heating equipment efficiency (which varies according to the fuel  uses) and climate. Energy efficiency indices (ODEX) can be defined as a ratio between the actual energy consumption of the sector in year t and the sum of the implied energy consumption from each underlying sub-sector/ end use in year t (based on the unit consumption of the sub-sector with a moving reference year. The evaluation of energy savings in household is carried out at the level of three end uses (heating, water heating and cooking) and five large appliances (refrigerators, freezers, washing machines, dishwashers and TVs). For each end use, the following indicators are used to measure efficiency progress: heating — unit consumption per m 2 per dwelling equivalent to central heating at normal climate; water heating — unit consumption per dwelling with water heating; and cooking — unit consumption per dwelling. The average energy consumption per m 2 per dwelling equivalent to central heating is used to leave out the impact of the diffusion of central heating. The effect of (heating) behaviour was estimated by assuming that technical progress cannot be reversed Household CO 2 -emissions covers the direct CO 2 emitted by fuel combustion.
Energy and non-energy related greenhouse gas emissions Energy and non-energy related greenhouse gas emissions Annual emissions of CO 2 , CH 4 , N 2 O, HFC, PFC and SF 6 in UNFCCC reporting format (In Mt = million tonnes) converted to their global warming potential (100 year time horizon) for addition and comparison with the Kyoto Protocol targets (1 t CH 4 = 21 t CO 2 -equivalent, 1 t N 2 O = 310 t CO2-equivalent, 1 t SF 6 = 23 900 t CO 2 -equivalent. HFCs and PFCs have a wide range of GWPs depending on the gas and emissions are already reported in t CO 2 -equivalent). For CO 2 only, the (national) totals do not include emissions from biomass burning or emissions or removals from land-use change and forestry (LUCF). The energy sector is responsible for energy-related emissions, such as those arising from fuel combustion activities and fugitive emissions from fuels. Fuel combustion activities include: energy industries, manufacturing industries and construction, transport, other sectors and other stationary or mobile emissions from fuel combustion. Fugitive emissions from fuels include: solid fuels and oil and natural gas. ’Energy production’ includes ‘Energy industries’ (i.e. public electricity and heat production, petroleum refining and the manufacture of solid fuels) and ‘Fugitive emissions’  (i.e. emissions from production, processing, transmission, storage and use of fuels, in particular coal-mining and gas production). ’Transport’ includes road transportation, national civil aviation, railways and navigation, and other non-road transportation. In accordance with UNFCCC and UNECE guidelines, emissions from international aviation and navigation are not included. ’Industry’ includes fossil fuel combustion (for heat and electricity) in manufacturing industries and construction (such as iron and steel, and non-ferrous metals). ‘Households’ includes fossil fuel combustion in households. ’Services sector’ includes fossil fuel combustion (for heat and electricity) from small commercial businesses, public institutions, agricultural businesses and military. Non-energy related emissions include ‘Industry’ (i.e. processes in manufacturing industries and construction without fossil fuel combustion including production and consumption of fluorinated gases), ‘Agriculture’ (i.e. domestic livestock (dairy and non-dairy cattle) keeping, in particular manure management and enteric fermentation and emissions from soils) ‘Waste’ (i.e. waste management facilities, in particular landfill sites and incineration plants and ‘Other non-energy’ (i.e. solvent and other product use).
Energy efficiency and energy consumption in industry Energy efficiency and energy consumption in industry Specific consumption per tonne produced : Energy consumption divided by the physical production (for steel, cement , paper) Energy efficiency index of industry (ODEX) is a weighted average of the specific consumption index of 10 manufacturing branches; the weight being the share of each branch in the sum of the energy consumption of these branches in year t and the sum of the implied energy consumption from each underlying industrial branches in year t (based on the unit consumption of the sub-sector with a moving reference year). The 10 branches considered in the calculation are: chemical, steel, non ferrous, cement, other non metallic, paper, food, machinery, transport equipment and textile. For steel, cement and paper, energy savings are calculated using specific consumption per tonne produced; for the other branches, the indicator used is the ratio on energy consumption related to production index. The variation of the weighted index of the unit consumption between t-1 and t is defined as follows: It -1/It = SUMi ECi,t *(UCi,t/UCi.t-1) with : energy share EC i  (consumption of each branch i   in total industry consumption); unit consumption index UC i (ratio : consumption related to production index or ratio : consumption related to physical production of steel, cement  and paper) t refers the current year, t-1 to the previous year The value at year t can be derived from the value at the previous year by reversing the calculation:  It /It -1= 1/( It -1/It) ODEX is set at 100 for a reference year and successive values are then derived for each year t by the value of ODEX at year t-1 multiplied by It /It -1 CO 2 emissions from energy uses split between direct emissions and indirect emissions: Direct emissions refer to emissions from the combustion of coal, gas and oil products (source: EEA inventories 2009) Indirect emissions (or electricity related) refer to emissions in the power sector corresponding to the electricity consumption in the sector Indirect CO 2 = E ind/E tot * CO 2 ie with E : electricity consumption (ind for industry, tot for all sectors) (source ODYSSEE database); CO 2 ie : CO 2 emissions from public electricity and heat production ( source EEA, inventories 2009) CO 2 emissions from energy uses split between direct emissions and indirect emissions: Direct emissions refer to emissions from the combustion of coal, gas and oil products (source: EEA inventories 2009); Indirect emissions (or electricity related) refer to emissions in the power sector corresponding to the electricity consumption in the sector       Indirect CO 2 = E ind/E tot * CO 2 ie with E : electricity consumption (ind for industry, tot for all sectors) (source ODYSSEE database); CO 2 ie : CO 2 emissions from public electricity and heat production ( source EEA, inventories 2009)
Greenhouse gas emission trends Greenhouse gas emission trends This indicator presents anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions in Europe from 1990 onwards. It analyses the trends (total and by sector) in relation to the European Community and Member States Kyoto targets for the period 2008-2012. Definitions (from UNFCCC) Emissions: the release of greenhouse gases and/or their precursors into the atmosphere over a specified area and period of time. Greenhouse gases: those gaseous constituents of the atmosphere, both natural and anthropogenic, that absorb and re-emit infrared radiation. Sink: any process, activity or mechanism which removes a greenhouse gas, an aerosol or a precursor of a greenhouse gas from the atmosphere. Source: any process or activity which releases a greenhouse gas, an aerosol or a precursor of a greenhouse gas into the atmosphere. Emissions by sources and removals by sinks of greenhouse gases are calculated according to the Revised 1996 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (see Methodology ), as agreed upon by the Conference of the Parties to the UNFCCC. Scope Gases All the greenhouse gases covered by the Kyoto Protocol (CO 2 , CH 4 , N 2 O, SF 6 , HFCs and PFCs). This does not include the greenhouse gases that are also ozone-depleting substances and which are controlled by the Montreal Protocol (see CSI 006 ). In order to be aggregated, non-CO 2 gases are weighed by their respective global warming potential and presented in CO 2 -equivalent units. Emission sources The indicator provides information on emissions from the main anthropogenic greenhouse gas sources, distributed by main emitting sectors (according IPCC nomenclature): energy supply and use (including energy industry, fugitive emissions, energy use by industry and by other sectors, excluding the transport sector); transport; industry (processes, i.e. not including emissions from fossil fuel combustion for energy use); agriculture; waste; other (non-energy). Unless otherwise mentioned, the indicator does not cover emissions from international bunkers (international aviation and maritime transport), which are not covered by the Kyoto Protocol. In particular, these emissions are not taken into account in the total greenhouse gas emissions reported at national and EU levels. Emissions from land use, land-use change and forestry (LULUCF) are not included in total greenhouse gas emissions. Geographical area The indicator covers all 27 Member States from the European Union. Some figures also include information concerning other EEA Member States. Period covered The indicator covers annual emissions since 1990.

Comments

European Environment Agency (EEA)
Kongens Nytorv 6
1050 Copenhagen K
Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100