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You are here: Home / The European environment – state and outlook 2010 / Country assessments / Netherlands / Air pollution - State and impacts (Netherlands)

Air pollution - State and impacts (Netherlands)

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SOER Common environmental theme from Netherlands
Published: 26 Nov 2010 Modified: 08 Apr 2011

Exceedances of the limit values for NO2

Between 1990 and 2007, NO2 concentrations decreased (Figure 1). In 2008, the limit value for hourly average concentrations of NO2 was complied with throughout the country. In the same year, the limit value for yearly average concentrations of NO2 was likely exceeded along between 300 and 1000 km of roads. About 1 % of the Dutch population was exposed to concentrations in exceedance of the limit value for yearly average concentrations of NO2.

 

 Figure 1: NO2 concentrations in the Netherlands in 2007 (top) and measured trends since 1990 (bottom).

Figure 1: NO2 concentrations in the Netherlands in 2007 (top) and measured trends since 1990 (bottom). Source: http://www.milieuennatuurcompendium.nl/indicatoren/nl0231-Stikstofdioxideconcentratie.html?i=14-66

Exceedances of the limit values for PM10

In 2008, the limit value for yearly average concentrations of PM10 was complied with throughout the country, except in the direct vicinity of large point sources such as harbours with storage and handling of dry bulk goods (Figure 2). The limit value for daily average concentrations of PM10 was likely exceeded along between 50 and 100 km of roads. Exceedances also occur in the direct vicinity of stables in intensive agriculture and in the vicinity of harbours. In 2008, about 0.1 % of the Dutch population was exposed to concentrations in exceedance of the limit value for daily average concentrations of PM10.

Figure 2: Number of days in 2008 with PM10 levels above 50 g/m3 (top) and measured trends since 1990 (bottom).Figure 2: Number of days in 2008 with PM10 levels above 50 g/m3 (top) and measured trends since 1990 (bottom).

Figure 2: Number of days in 2008 with PM10 levels above 50 mg/m3 (top) and measured trends since 1990 (bottom). Source: http://www.milieuennatuurcompendium.nl/indicatoren/nl0243-Fijnstofconcentratie%2C-daggemiddelde.html?i=14-66

Exceedances of the target and limit values for PM2.5

Average PM2.5 concentrations in the urban background were about 16 mg/m3 in 2008. This is below the EU target value of 20 mg/m3 for 2010 for the average urban background concentration. Concentrations in busy streets were about 18 mg/m3 in 2008. This is below the EU target value of 25 mg/m3 for 2010 that applies anywhere.

Ozone concentrations are below target value

Ozone concentrations are below the target value for protection of human health throughout the country. The number of days with 8-hour average concentrations above 120 mg/m3 has decreased substantially in the period 1990-2000 (Figure 3). Since 2000, further improvement is absent.

Figure 3: Number of days per year with an ozone level above 120 ug/m3

Figure 3: Number of days per year with an ozone level above 120 mg/m3. Source: http://www.milieuennatuurcompendium.nl/indicatoren/nl0238-Ozonconcentraties-en-volksgezondheid.html?i=14-66

Deposition of acidifying and eutrophying substances, and exposure of vegetation to ozone

The deposition of acidifying substances has been reduced by about 50 % since the early 1980s. In 2007, the deposition was about 2920 mole H+/ha (Figure 4). The deposition is still above the national target of 2.300 mole H+/ha to be met by 2010.

Deposition of nitrogen has been rather stable during the past five years. In 2007, deposition was about 2190 mole N/ha. The deposition is still above the national target of 1.650 mole N/ha to be met by 2010.

Since the mid 1990s, ozone concentrations, expressed as AOT40, have been below the target value for the protection of vegetation of 18000 (mg/m3) x hour, averaged over five years. However, the long-term target for 2020 of 6000 (mg/m3) x hour is being exceeded.

 

Figure 4a: Deposition of eutrophying and acidifying compounds, and exposure of vegetation to ozone. Figure 4b: Deposition of eutrophying and acidifying compounds, and exposure of vegetation to ozone. Figure 4c: Deposition of eutrophying and acidifying compounds, and exposure of vegetation to ozone.

Figure 4: Deposition of eutrophying and acidifying compounds, and exposure of vegetation to ozone. Source: http://www.milieuennatuurcompendium.nl/indicatoren/nl0189-Vermestende-depositie.html?i=14-66; http://www.milieuennatuurcompendium.nl/indicatoren/nl0184-Verzurende-depositie.html?i=14-66; http://www.milieuennatuurcompendium.nl/indicatoren/nl0240-Ozonconcentraties-en-vegetatie.html?i=14-66

Impacts

Current and future impacts of air pollution on public health and vegetation are discussed in Section 5 (Outlook).

Geographic coverage

Disclaimer

The country assessments are the sole responsibility of the EEA member and cooperating countries supported by the EEA through guidance, translation and editing.

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