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You are here: Home / The European environment – state and outlook 2010 / Country assessments / Albania / Waste - State and impacts (Albania)

Waste - State and impacts (Albania)

SOER Common environmental theme from Albania
Topic
Waste Waste
Published: 30 Nov 2010 Modified: 08 Apr 2011

 


Municipal waste increased in 2009 compared to previous years (Figure 1). This is evidence of the increasing consumer behaviour of the population which inevitably leads to more municipal waste. On the other hand, waste from the construction sector decreased during 2009 compared to previous years (Figure 2). Total waste is shown in Table 1.

 

 Figure 1: Municipal solid waste 2005–09

 

Figure 1: Municipal solid waste 2005–09

Source: Ministry of Public Works, Transport and Telecommunication

 

Construction and demolition waste 2005–09

 

Figure 2: Construction and demolition waste 2005–09

Source: Ministry of Public Works, Transport and Telecommunication

 

Table 1: Total generation of waste

 

Year

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Municipal waste

571 218

622 400

 

633 599

722 729

722 731

762 353

857 223

Construction and demolition waste

6 988 441

591 000

645 387

506 540

506 540

455 866

455 866

Total

1 270 059

1 213 000

1 278 986

1 229 269

1 229 271

1 218 219

1 313 089

 

Source: Ministry of Public Works, Transport and Telecommunication

 

The composition of waste over the period September–December 2009, according to a study conducted by the project Implementation of National Plan for Approximation of Environmental Legislation (INPAEL), is given in Table 2 below.

 

Waste stream

Average % in municipal waste stream

 

Weight within municipal waste of Albania/day

 (0.7 kg/person/day)

Weight within municipal waste of Albania/year

 (266 kg/person/year)

 

 

 

2 335 tonne/day

852 360 tonne/year

Organics

47.36

1 106

403 690

Wood

1.43

33

12 045

Paper

5.37

125

45 625

Cardboard

8.13

190

69 350

Total biodegradables

 

62.3

1 454

530 710

 

 

 

 

LD plastics

8.46

198

72 270

HD plastics

4.75

111

40 515

Glass

5.75

134

48 910

Textiles

5.27

123

44 895

Metals — ferrous

0.56

13

4 745

Metals — non-ferrous

0.57

13

4 745

Healthcare waste

0.17

4

1 460

Rubber

0.2

5

1 825

Inert waste

7.20

168

61 320

San-Pro waste

3.25

76

27 740

WEEE

0.31

                       7

2 555

Batteries

0.02

1

365

Animal by-product waste

1.08

25

9 125

 

Table 2: Composition of waste, September–December 2009

Source: INPAEL project

 

The waste management system is at a low level because of the weak collection systems in cities and almost no collection systems in rural areas. Private companies, financed by municipalities, clean the cities, and collect and transport waste to landfills. Albania has very few recycling/reusing systems for waste and few engineered landfills for the disposal of waste. The necessary stipulation for waste recycling is the separation of the waste at source; a request to organise and establish separate collection systems of waste from households has been made to local authorities (municipalities). This system will help in the separation of plastic, glass and metallic packaging, paperboard, unrefined aluminates, etc.

Most of the waste in rural areas is deposited in undefined places and especially in water courses where waste is then transported to other places. There is no system for the safe management of hazardous waste (neither domestic nor commercial). The main method for waste treatment is the construction of landfills although it should be noted that these landfills are not properly constructed and, thus, cause continuing pollution of the environment.

Hazardous waste generated by the industrial sector and municipal wastes are deposited together with urban waste. The biggest problem at landfills is uncontrolled fires, which release toxic gases (dioxin, furan) in populated areas, presenting a serious problem for human health. Also of concern are the polluted water sinks created at the landfills and not treated, which poses a great risk of polluting surface waters and groundwater.

Progress towards better waste management has been made in the construction of new landfills in some regions which comply with environmental standards. Further landfills are under development (Table 3).

 

Table 3: Waste landfills in Albania

 

No

Landfill Site

Surface area

Capacity

Notes

1

Bestrova 1 (Vlore)

12 ha

1 044 690 m3

 

2

Bushat (Shkoder)

12 ha

1 000 000 m3

 

3

Bajkaj (Delvine)

5 ha

Only a feasibility study has been carried out

4

Sharre (Tirane)

15 ha

2 900 000 tonnes

 

5

Korçe

10 ha

Only a feasibility study has been carried out

6

Rubik

5 000 m2

3500 tonnes/year

 

7

Peshkopi

8 000 m2

Only a feasibility study has been carried out

Source: Ministry of Public Works, Transport and Telecommunication

The construction of regional municipal waste landfills in 12 areas is planned in the draft National Plan on Municipal Waste Management 2010–25. This indicates progress towards full waste collection schemes for the whole population.

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The country assessments are the sole responsibility of the EEA member and cooperating countries supported by the EEA through guidance, translation and editing.

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