Personal tools

Notifications
Get notifications on new reports and products. Frequency: 3-4 emails / month.
Subscriptions
Sign up to receive our reports (print and/or electronic) and quarterly e-newsletter.
Follow us
Twitter icon Twitter
Facebook icon Facebook
YouTube icon YouTube channel
RSS logo RSS Feeds
More

Write to us Write to us

For the public:


For media and journalists:

Contact EEA staff
Contact the web team
FAQ

Call us Call us

Reception:

Phone: (+45) 33 36 71 00
Fax: (+45) 33 36 71 99


next
previous
items

Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Sound and independent information
on the environment

You are here: Home / Data and maps / Indicators / Emissions of primary particles and secondary particulate matter precursors / Emissions of primary particles and secondary particulate matter precursors (CSI 003) - Assessment published Mar 2008

Emissions of primary particles and secondary particulate matter precursors (CSI 003) - Assessment published Mar 2008

Generic metadata

Topics:

Air pollution Air pollution (Primary topic)

Environment and health Environment and health

Tags:
ozone | csi | emissions | air
DPSIR: Pressure
Typology: Performance indicator (Type B - Does it matter?)
Indicator codes
  • CSI 003
Dynamic
Temporal coverage:
1990-2005, 2007
 
Contents
 

Key policy question: What progress is being made in reducing emissions of primary particulate matter (PM10) and secondary particulate matter precursors?

Key messages

Aggregated emissions of primary particles (PM10) and secondary particulate precursors (NOx, SO2, NH3) were reduced by 45% across the EEA member countries between 1990 and 2005 (Figure 1). This was mainly due to the reduction in emissions of the secondary particulate precursors which were reduced by 45% during this period, but also due to reductions in primary PM10 emissions from energy industries, due to the move away from coal to natural gas for electricity generation and improvements in the performance of particulate abatement equipment at coal-fired power stations.

Total EU-15 emissions of fine particles were reduced by 46% between 1990 and 2005 (Figure 2) with the highest decrease in the energy industry sector which reduced its emissions by 65% during this period.

Between 1990 and 2005, total new EU-12 emissions of fine particulate matter were reduced by 54% (Figure 3) mainly due to reductions achieved in the industry and energy sectors which reduced their emissions by 70% and 60%, respectively.

Emissions of primary and secondary fine particles (EU-15)

Note:

Data source:

Data from 2007 officially reported national total and sectoral emissions to UNECE/EMEP Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Atmospheric Pollution. Where emissions of primary PM10 were not reported by countries, emission estimates have been obtained from the RAINS PM10 model (IIASA).

Downloads and more info

Emissions of primary and secondary fine particles (EU-27 - EU-15)

Note: N/A

Data source:

Data from 2007 officially reported national total and sectoral emissions to UNECE/EMEP Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Atmospheric Pollution. Where emissions of primary PM10 were not reported by countries, emission estimates have been obtained from the RAINS PM10 model (IIASA).

Downloads and more info

Change in emission of primary and secondary fine particles (EEA member countries)

Note: -

Data source:

Data from 2007 officially reported national total and sectoral emissions to UNECE/EMEP Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Atmospheric Pollution. Where emissions of primary PM10 were not reported by countries, emission estimates have been obtained from the RAINS PM10 model (IIASA).

Downloads and more info

Emissions of primary and secondary fine particles (EEA member countries)

Note:

Data source:

Data from 2007 officially reported national total and sectoral emissions to UNECE/EMEP Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Atmospheric Pollution. Where emissions of primary PM10 were not reported by countries, emission estimates have been obtained from the RAINS PM10 model (IIASA).

Downloads and more info

Key assessment

Emissions of primary PM10 and secondary particulate precursors were reduced by 45% across the EEA member countries between 1990 and 2005. The greatest decrease in emissions was achieved in the energy and industry sectors, where emissions declined by 61% and 53%, respectively.

EU-15 emissions of fine particles were reduced by 46% between 1990 and 2005. Emissions of the secondary particulate precursors NOx (31%) and SO2 (51%) were the most important contributing pollutants to particulate formation in the EU-15 in 2005. The reductions in total emissions between 1990 and 2005 were due mainly to the introduction or improvement of abatement measures in the energy, road transport, and industry sectors. These three sectors contributed 50%, 22% and 15%, respectively, to the total reduction.

The new EU-12 has experienced a reduction in emissions since 1990, with the energy industries sector contributing 50% of the overall reduction. Over the same period, emissions from the agriculture and industry sectors have also decreased significantly, contributing 7% and 24% respectively of the overall reduction. As for the EU-15, emissions of NOx (21%) and SO2 (67%) were the most important contributing pollutants to particulate formation in the new EU-12 in 2005.

Specific policy question: How do different sectors and processes contribute to emissions of PM10 and their precursors?

Sector split emissions of primary and secondary fine particulates (EEA member countries; EU-15; EU-27 - EU-15; EFTA-4 and CC-3)

Note: N/A

Data source:

Data from 2007 officially reported national total and sectoral emissions to UNECE/EMEP Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Atmospheric Pollution. Where emissions of primary PM10 were not reported by countries, emission estimates have been obtained from the RAINS PM10 model (IIASA).

Downloads and more info

Contribution to change in emissions of primary and secondary fine particulates (PM10) for each sector and pollutant (EEA member countries)

Note: Contribution to change plots show the contribution to the total emission change between 1990-2005 made by a specified sector/ pollutant

Data source:

Data from 2007 officially reported national total and sectoral emissions to UNECE/EMEP Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Atmospheric Pollution. Where emissions of primary PM10 were not reported by countries, emission estimates have been obtained from the RAINS PM10 model (IIASA).

Downloads and more info

Contribution to change in emissions of primary and secondary fine particulates (PM10) for each sector and pollutant (EU-15)

Note: Contribution to change plots show the contribution to the total emission change between 1990-2005 made by a specified sector/ pollutant

Data source:

Data from 2007 officially reported national total and sectoral emissions to UNECE/EMEP Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Atmospheric Pollution. Where emissions of primary PM10 were not reported by countries, emission estimates have been obtained from the RAINS PM10 model (IIASA).

Downloads and more info

Contribution to change in emissions of primary and secondary fine particulates (PM10) for each sector and pollutant (EU-27 - EU-15)

Note: Contribution to change plots show the contribution to the total emission change between 1990-2005 made by a specified sector/ pollutant

Data source:

Data from 2007 officially reported national total and sectoral emissions to UNECE/EMEP Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Atmospheric Pollution. Where emissions of primary PM10 were not reported by countries, emission estimates have been obtained from the RAINS PM10 model (IIASA).

Downloads and more info

Specific assessment

The most important sources of PM10 emissions in 2005 in the EU-15 were the 'road transport' (25% of total emissions) and the 'energy industries' (23%) sectors. However, between 1990 and 2005 emissions from these sectors declined by 65% (energy industries) and 42% (road transport).

The most important sources of PM10 emissions in 2005 in the new EU-12 Member States were 'industry processes' (53% of total emissions), 'energy industry' (39%) and 'road transport' (15%) sectors. The largest decrease in emissions from primary particles and secondary particulate precursors occurred in the 'energy industries' and i'ndustry (energy)' sectors (70% and 60%, respectively) between 1990 and 2005.

As described in the main assessment, emission reductions between 1990 and 2005 were mainly due to the introduction of abatement measures in the 'energy industries' and 'road transport' sectors. Overall, the reduction in emissions of energy-related particulate pollutants was mainly achieved through a combination of the use of fuels with lower sulphur content, fuel switching from coal and oil to natural gas, the deployment of emission abatement technologies in the energy supply and industry sectors as well as an increased market penetration of road vehicles with catalytic converters.

Emissions of primary PM10, and secondary PM10 precursors are expected to decrease in the future as vehicle technologies are further improved and stationary fuel combustion emissions are controlled through abatement or use of low sulphur fuels such as natural gas. Despite this, it is expected that in the near future the majority of the urban areas across the EU-15 and new EU-12 territory, PM10 concentrations will still be well above the EU limit values for PM10 mainly as a result of the continued growth of road transport. Substantial further reductions in emissions will therefore be needed to reach the air quality limit values set in the EU First Daughter Directive to the Framework Directive on Ambient Air Quality.

Data sources

More information about this indicator

See this indicator specification for more details.

Contacts and ownership

EEA Contact Info

Martin Adams

Ownership

EEA Management Plan

2010 (note: EEA internal system)

Dates

Document Actions
Filed under: , , ,

Comments

European Environment Agency (EEA)
Kongens Nytorv 6
1050 Copenhagen K
Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100