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Global search on data, maps and indicators

Seasonal water scarcity conditions across Europe, measured by the water exploitation index plus (WEI+) for sub river basins, 2019

Water exploitation index plus (WEI+) illustrates the percentage of water use versus water available in the respective subbasin.

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Area affected during at least for one quarter of the year by water scarcity conditions in the EU, measured by the water exploitation index plus

The graph presents trend with the area of the European Union affected by water scarcity conditions between 2000-2019. Water scarcity conditions is adopted, i.e. when WEI+ values are above 20% for at least a quarter of the year in a given river sub basin; annual quarters are: Q1 (January-March), Q2 (April-June), Q3 (July-September), Q4 (October-December). No sufficient data available from Italy, hence Italian river basins have not been included in the analysis.

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Worst seasonal water scarcity conditions for European countries in 2019, measured by the water exploitation index plus (WEI+)

This figure gives an overview of the worst quarterly water scarcity conditions (maximum WEI+ in a consecutive 3-month period) of 2019 across countries in Europe. Seasonal WEI+ values are estimated as quarterly averages per country. The worst quarter of the year for water scarcity conditions is provided in brackets next to the name of the country. Annual quarters are: Q1 (January-March), Q2 (April-June), Q3 (July-September), Q4 (October-December). No data is available for Montenegro and Lichtenstein.

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EU underwater noise energy (J) by sea, 2014-2020

The figure shows EU underwater radiated noise (URN) emissions per sea basin per year.

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Possible oil spills detected by the European Maritime Safety Agency

The figure shows the potential number of oil spills each year as detected by the CleanSeaNet service.

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Median of marine litter items by beach and marine region

This data shows median of marine litter items by beach and marine region, based on Marine Litter Watch (MLW) dataset in the period 2013-2020.

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Emissions in European shipping areas (EMTER)

Datasets showing SO2 (2014 and 2019), NOx (2019), PM2.5 (2019) emissions in European shipping areas. These datasets have been prepared in relation to the development of the first European Maritime Transport Environmental Report (EMSA-EEA report, 2021: https://www.eea.europa.eu/publications/maritime-transport).

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Observed and projected decline in Arctic sea-ice area

This figure combines two data sources. The left part of the figure (black lines) shows the observed change in Arctic sea ice over the period 1979 to 2022 for March (maximum ice cover) and September (minimum ice cover) based on the EUMETSAT OSI SAF Sea Ice Index v2.1 dataset. The right part shows projections of the Arctic sea ice area in March and September from CMIP6 simulations for three emissions scenarios. The thick lines denote the multi-model ensemble mean (24-27 models, depending on the scenario), and the shading shows the likely uncertainty interval (one standard deviation around the multi-model mean). The dashed black line indicates a threshold for near ice-free conditions.

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Maximum extent of ice cover in the Baltic Sea in the winter and 15 year moving average

Maximum extent of ice cover in the Baltic Sea in the winters 1719/20–2021/22 (blue bars) and 15 year moving average (black line). Source: Jouni Vainio, Finnish Meteorological Institute (updated from Seinä and Palosuo 1996; Seinä et al. 2001).

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Past trend and projected change in relative sea level across Europe

Trends: The arrows show the observed trend in sea level relative to land since 1970 for those tide gauges along the Europe coastline with sufficiently long time series. Projections: European sea level change for 2081–2100 for SSP5-8.5 in metres. Results use CMIP6 model projections for long term scenario (2081-2100), for SSP5-8.5, and with respect to a baseline of 1995-2014.

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Observed and projected change in global mean sea level

The left chart shows the global mean sea level (GMSL) rise based on tide gauge reconstructions (grey line) and satellite observations (black line). The figure depicts the rise in global mean sea level from 1900 to 2021 based on two data sources. All values are relative to the average level of the period 1993-2010, during which the two datasets overlap. The grey line (Palmer et al., 2021) shows the ensemble sea-level reconstruction (using five members) of sea level anomalies during 1900-2010 (Palmer et al., 2021; https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/abdaec#erlabdaecs2). The black line (CMEMS) shows the filtered sea level anomalies corrected for the TOPEX-A instrumental drift (Ablain et al., 2017; WCRP Sea Level Budget Group, 2018), corrected for the GIA using the ICE5G-VM2 GIA model (Peltier, 2004), for the time series from 1993 to 2021. The right chart shows global mean sea level projections under different SSP scenarios. Sea level projections considering only processes for which projections can be made with at least medium confidence are provided, relative to the period 1995-2014, for five Shared Socioeconomic Pathway (SSP) scenarios. The scenarios are described in sections TS1.3 and 1.6 and Cross-Chapter Box 1.4 of the Working Group 1 contribution. Sea level projections considering only processes for which projections can be made with at least medium confidence are provided, relative to the period 1995-2014, for five Shared Socioeconomic Pathway (SSP) scenarios. The scenarios are described in sections TS1.3 and 1.6 and Cross-Chapter Box 1.4 of the Working Group 1 contribution.

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Viewer on combined health impacts from road traffic noise and air pollution in urban areas

This viewer presents the combined health impact of air pollution and road traffic noise at 1km x 1km resolution in cities where data is available. The impact of air pollution is measured in terms of mortality and the impact of road noise pollution is measured in terms of long-term high annoyance. The viewer is based on data submitted under the Environmental Noise Directive and the Air Quality Directive and represents the situation in 2017.

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Return period of current 100‐year extreme sea levels under two emissions scenarios

Solid coloured boxes show the ensemble mean value and coloured shading shows the inter‐model variability (from worst to best case). The mean value for the entire European coastline and values for the coasts of 10 geographical regions are shown. N-North, northern part of the North Atlantic; S-North Atlantic, southern part of the North Atlantic; RCP, representative concentration pathway; RCP4.5: medium emissions scenario; RCP8.5: high emissions scenario

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Projected change in the frequency of historical 1-in-100 year coastal flooding events by 2100

This maps show the estimated multiplication factor, by which the frequency of flooding events of a given height changes between 2010 and 2100 due to projected regional sea relative level rise under the RCP2.6 and RCP8.5 scenarios. Values larger than 1 indicate an increase in flooding frequency. Adapted from Figure 4.12 of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere (SROCC).

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Site status in contaminated sites management

This table presents the definition of six management steps (site status) which characterise the management status of contaminated sites.

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Terminology related to contaminated sites

This table presents explanations of terms used to understand the management of contaminated sites.

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Potentially contaminated sites in the EU, as registered in national inventories

The figure presents the trend in the number of registered potentially contaminated sites in 2006, 2011 and 2016.

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Serbia – air pollution country fact sheet

A significant proportion of Europe's urban population lives in cities where EU air quality standards for the protection of human health are regularly exceeded. Air pollution continues to have significant impacts on the health of Europeans, particularly in urban areas. These health impacts have economic costs, cutting short lives, increasing medical costs and reducing productivity through lost working days. The pollutants with the most serious impacts on human health are particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide and ground-level ozone.

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North Macedonia – air pollution country fact sheet

A significant proportion of Europe's urban population lives in cities where EU air quality standards for the protection of human health are regularly exceeded. Air pollution continues to have significant impacts on the health of Europeans, particularly in urban areas. These health impacts have economic costs, cutting short lives, increasing medical costs and reducing productivity through lost working days. The pollutants with the most serious impacts on human health are particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide and ground-level ozone.

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Kosovo – air pollution country fact sheet

A significant proportion of Europe's urban population lives in cities where EU air quality standards for the protection of human health are regularly exceeded. Air pollution continues to have significant impacts on the health of Europeans, particularly in urban areas. These health impacts have economic costs, cutting short lives, increasing medical costs and reducing productivity through lost working days. The pollutants with the most serious impacts on human health are particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide and ground-level ozone.

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