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on the environment

You are here: Home / Environmental topics / Water / Multimedia

Multimedia

All multimedia about water

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If Water could speak

Here is Water. You have met before. In fact, you come across Water in everything you do. Your life would not exist without Water. But Water is not infinite and we are draining our supplies. We need to rethink the way we are using Water. Every drop counts   More

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Water and preparing for scarcity

The European Environment Agency launched a new report on the need for an efficient use of water resources at the 6th World Water Forum in Marseille, France. This short interview with Jacqueline McGlade, Executive Director of EEA, gives a short introduction to the pressures Europe's water resources are facing, the policy debate in Europe and the importance of being able to put a value on this vital resource.   More

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City of five seas: Environmental Atlas of Europe — Russia

Nizhny Novgorod has a population of 1.3 million and is one of Russia's most important industrial cities. Its process manufacturing plants are heavily reliant on water, supplied from the Volga River and one of its tributaries, the Oka. The region's drinking water also comes from the Upper Volga Basin.   More

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Share your information on bathing water quality

Prof. Jacqueline McGlade, Executive Director of the EEA, invites beachgoers to visit and contribute to the Eye on Earth interactive web map.   More

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Getting Europe's precious waters clean again

Protecting water from pollution is one of the biggest environmental challenges that we face. In recent decades, major disasters like the Sandoz incident in 1986 demonstrated that pollution knows no frontiers and that strong EU actions and cooperation were needed. This detailed news report looks at the ways in which Europe’s determination to protect water in all its forms is achieving results. From the European quality of the drinking water, through the treatment of waste water, to protection of its rivers, coasts and lakes – over the last few decades it has developed an effective legislative arsenal. The aim of the European Union is for all the water on its territory to by in good status by 2015. Although challenges remain, results are obvious. For example, in 2000, the EU adopted a directive promoting trans-boundary co-operation and introducing the river basin management concept where the territory of the river as a whole is taken into account. And in terms of bathing water, since 1990, the number of bathing sites fulfilling the EU standards has increased by almost 30% to an impressive 90%.   More

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Living with Climate change

Global warming is happening. Temperatures have already risen by 0.76 degrees since the industrial revolution and are projected to rise further by 1.8 - 4 degrees by the end of the century. The last time climate change happened at this pace was 125,000 years ago and led to a 4-6 metre sea level rise. Global warming at the upper end of the scale predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change would have catastrophic consequences for Europe. Up to 30% of plant, animal and bird species would be wiped out and the threat of natural disasters such as landslides, floods and mudslides would increase significantly.   More

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Introduction of the film 'Our Arctic Challenge'

Jacqueline McGlade, Executive Director of the European Environment Agency (EEA), and three of her colleagues have chosen to be part of an extraordinary journey in East Greenland. They travel from their offices in Copenhagen to participate in a multi sport race, where they challenge themselves through 250 kilometers of the Arctic wilderness. On their way they encounter the effects of climate change and its impact on the Arctic environment. The Inuit are among the first people to experience the effects of climate change. They are in the middle of an environmental challenge that will change many parts of their culture. What is happening to the Inuit today will happen to the rest of the world tomorrow. We will all need to adapt to climate change.   More

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Europe's seas and coasts expert

Eva Wlodarczyk, expert on Water, Seawater The seas around Europe are of vital importance to us, since historical times, they served as the source of food and employment for the people living around the seas and also as transport routes. Following the progress in the past century, the seas found new users; for example there was exploitation of marrying oil and gas fields, the extraction of sand and gravel from the sea bed, also fishing for the deep water species and even the extraction of minerals from the very deep ocean basins.   More

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Pollution from antifouling paint

(Transcription of audio on video) Antifouling paint was developed to reduce drag on ship hulls by preventing the buildup of barnacles and other organisms, consequently making ships faster and more fuel efficient. However its propensity for wider impacts on the marine environment had been grossly underestimated. The chemicals used prevented molluscs like oysters from reproducing, and in the 1970's and 80's widespread collapse of mollusc stocks in and around harbours was reported. These types of paints have now been banned on small vessels, and complete phase out from global shipping fleets is planned by 2008. Source: SOER 2005   More

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Sources of water pollution

(Transcription of audio on video) Water can be polluted from many sources. Faecal contamination from sewage makes water unpleasant and unsafe for recreational activities such as swimming, boating or fishing. Many organic pollutants, including sewage effluent and farm and food-processing wastes consume oxygen, suffocating fish and other aquatic life. Nutrients such as nitrates and phosphates, from everything from farm fertilisers to household detergents, can 'overfertilise' the water causing the growth of large mats of algae, some of which are directly toxic. When the algae die, they sink to the water bottom, decomposing, consuming oxygen and damaging ecosystems. Chemical contaminants including heavy metals, pesticides and some industrial chemicals can threaten wildlife and human health. Sediment run-off from the land can make water muddy, blocking sunlight and, as a result, killing wildlife. And irrigation, especially when used improperly, can bring flows of salts, nutrients and other pollutants from soils into water. Source: SOER 2005   More

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Ask an expert on ground water

Pavla Chyská- EEA expert on Water, Ground water "Ground water is a very important element of the earth's hydrological cycle. It comes from rain and snow melt that seeps into the grounds. Its hidden below the earth's surface and, compared with rivers and lakes, it receives less attention from people but its influence on our lives is enormous. Ground water is very important because it's a vital part of the eco-systems on our planet and, yes, life exists in ground water too. Many water eco-systems like springs, rivers and streams depend on it. Ground water is also a major source of water for people and especially quality drinking water. In Europe as a whole, about 65% of public water supply is provided by ground water."   More

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Water and hydroelectric power

Although hydroelectric power stations create power from a reusable resource, there are some concerns about their impact on water. They alter the flow and temperature regimes that destroy fish spawning areas, handicap fish migration, kill fish in turbines and dry out wetlands. They can also capture sediment and nutrients behind dams, which can reduce the fertility of the waters downstream and may also increase erosion of river banks. For instance dams have reduced the sediment carried into Lake Geneva by some 50 %. Climate change could also make many hydroelectric power plants less reliable in future as water availability changes. While some plants in northern Europe could generate more power, hydroelectric dams in Bulgaria, Portugal, Spain, Turkey and Ukraine could reduce output by 20-50 % because of declining rainfall. Source: State of the Environment Report No 1/2005 "The European environment - State and outlook 2005" (published 29 Nov 2005)   More

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Limfjorden, Denmark

Limfjorden, Denmark. Photo by Peter Kristensen, EEA   More

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Storebaelt, Denmark

Storebaelt, Denmark. Photo by Peter Kristensen, EEA   More

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Faaborg, Denmark

Faaborg, Denmark. Photo by Peter Kristensen, EEA   More

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Tenerife, Spain

Tenerife, Spain. Photo by Peter Kristensen, EEA   More

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Tenerife, Spain

Tenerife, Spain. Photo by Peter Kristensen, EEA   More

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Tenerife, Spain

Tenerife, Spain. Photo by Peter Kristensen, EEA   More

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Serpentine lake, London

Serpentine lake, London. Photo by Lidija Globevnik, IWRS   More

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Serpentine lake, London

Serpentine lake, London. Photo by Lidija Globevnik, IWRS   More

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