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You are here: Home / Environmental topics / Policy instruments / Multimedia

Multimedia

All multimedia about policy instruments

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Shifting taxes from labour to resource consumption - Jacqueline McGlade

What is Environmental Fiscal Reform? And how could fairer taxes benefit the environment? We have asked few questions to EEA Executive Director Jacqueline McGlade   More

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Shifting taxes from labour to resource consumption - Gerben-Jan Gerbrandy

What is Environmental Fiscal Reform? And how could fairer taxes benefit the environment? We have asked few questions to Gerben-Jan Gerbrandy, Member of the European Parliament.   More

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Shifting taxes from labour to resource consumption - Janez Potočnik

What is Environmental Fiscal Reform? And how could fairer taxes benefit the environment? We have asked few questions to Janez Potočnik, European Commissioner for the Environment   More

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The difficulties in implementing an eco-tax reform

Michael Jacobs is Visiting Professor at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment at the London School of Economics. He answers the question "In your opinion, what are the difficulties in implementing an eco-tax reform? "   More

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Germany's and Asia's recent developments in environmental taxation

Kai Schlegelmilch is an economist and vice-president of Green Budget Europe. He has advised governments in China, Vietnam and Thailand regarding the introduction of environmental taxation on behalf of the German International Cooperation. Formerly, he worked for the Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment, Energy and the European Environment Agency in Copenhagen.   More

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What are the challenges in persuading governments to adopt an eco-tax reform?

Prof. Mikael Skou Andersen, senior economist at the European Environment Agency, answers two questions: - what are the challenges in persuading governments to adopt an eco-tax reform? - will environmental taxes be an additional burden on the taxpayer? Prof. Mikael Skou Andersen is an environmental economist and policy analyst at the European Environment Agency.   More

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What is an eco-tax reform?

David Gee explains the basic principles of an environmental tax reform. David is a senior adviser for science, policy, and emerging issues at the European Environment Agency.   More

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Emissions trading - putting a price on carbon

The EU Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) is a world first and a major weapon in Europe's fight against climate change. The innovative system has turned carbon dioxide emissions into a tradeable commodity. They can now be bought and sold like any other of the thousands of products traded on world markets today. The scheme works by placing a limit or a 'cap' on the amount of carbon dioxide participating installations - currently around 10,500 across the European Union - can emit every year. If an installation emits more than its allowance, it must either pay a very hefty fine or buy surplus allowances from companies that have managed to stay below their limit. The system ensures that overall CO2 emissions from the plants covered are cut in the most cost effective way.   More

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50 years of protecting Europe's environment

Today the European Union has the most environmentally friendly arsenal of rules in the world and has done more to tackle pressing ecological problems, such as climate change, than any other major power. But it has not always been like this. Caring for the environment did not feature in the Treaty of Rome, the document that gave birth to the modern day EU. Yet environmental problems were never far away. Europe’s love affair with the car was moving into top gear, industry was busy belching out pollutants and raw sewage was being pumped into our rivers and seas.   More

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Prof. Jacqueline McGlade on adapting to the impacts of climate change – speech for the ESPACE initiative

In her speech, Prof. Jacqueline McGlade, Executive Director of the European Environment Agency (EEA), stresses the importance of imbedding climate change into planning systems and processes. ESPACE (European Spatial Planning: Adapting to Climate Events) is a four-year European project promoting the importance of adapting the entire planning process to the impacts of climate change.   More

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“If I were President of Europe…” – just what would you do to help the environment?

Students from the Copenhagen International School answer to the question “If you were the President of Europe, what would you do to help decrease pollution and improve our environment?”. Increasing taxes on cars and using that money to invest in environmentally-friendly forms of transportation are the most cited policies a green President would implement.   More

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What are the environmental concerns of Europe’s future policy makers?

Curious as to how the future policy-makers and voters feel about Europe's environment, the EEA interviewed young Europeans at the first ever Youth Summit organised by the European Commission. The event was part of the celebrations of the 50th anniversary of the Rome Treaty. More environmental education, alternative sources of energy and stricter transportation laws are some of the proposals put forth by the youth.   More

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Celebrating Europe and its environment – past successes, future challenges. Interview with EEA’s executive director Prof. Jacqueline McGlade

2007 marks the 50th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome. In this interview, EEA’s executive director Prof. Jacqueline McGlade looks back at the last 50 years of Europe’s environmental policy and reflects on the challenges that still lie ahead.   More

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Sources of water pollution

(Transcription of audio on video) Water can be polluted from many sources. Faecal contamination from sewage makes water unpleasant and unsafe for recreational activities such as swimming, boating or fishing. Many organic pollutants, including sewage effluent and farm and food-processing wastes consume oxygen, suffocating fish and other aquatic life. Nutrients such as nitrates and phosphates, from everything from farm fertilisers to household detergents, can 'overfertilise' the water causing the growth of large mats of algae, some of which are directly toxic. When the algae die, they sink to the water bottom, decomposing, consuming oxygen and damaging ecosystems. Chemical contaminants including heavy metals, pesticides and some industrial chemicals can threaten wildlife and human health. Sediment run-off from the land can make water muddy, blocking sunlight and, as a result, killing wildlife. And irrigation, especially when used improperly, can bring flows of salts, nutrients and other pollutants from soils into water. Source: SOER 2005   More

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