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Infographic Vehicle emissions and efficiency
In a conventional vehicle, only about 18 to 25 % of the energy available from the fuel is used to move it on the road, depending on the driving conditions. The rest of the energy is lost to engine and drivetrain inefficiencies.
Located in Media Infographics
External Data Reference Mind the Gap 2015: Closing the chasm between test and real-world car CO2 emissions
Report of the European Federation for Transport and Environment: The system of testing cars to measure fuel economy and CO2 emissions is utterly discredited. This report analyses the gap between test results and real-world performance and finds that it has become a chasm, increasing from 8% in 2001 to 31% in 2012 and 40% in 2014. Without action this gap will grow to nearly 50% by 2020.
Located in Data and maps Datasets External datasets catalogue
Infographic Troff document Flexibilities in the NEDC test approval procedure
Flexibilities exploited by manufacturers during the NEDC test cycle can be broadlygrouped into two categories: those relevant to the initial coast-down test and thoserelevant to the type approval test itself.
Located in Media Infographics
External Data Reference Copert 4
The popular, straightforward and simple to use emissions calculator. COPERT 4 is a software tool used world-wide to calculate air pollutant and greenhouse gas emissions from road transport. The development of COPERT is coordinated by the  European Environment Agency (EEA) , in the framework of the activities of the  European Topic Centre for Air Pollution and Climate Change Mitigation . The European Commission's  Joint Research Centre  manages the scientific development of the model. COPERT has been developed for official road transport emission inventory preparation in EEA  member countries . However, it is applicable to all relevant research, scientific and academic applications.
Located in Data and maps Datasets External datasets catalogue
External Data Reference Different types of emissions from vehicles
Located in Data and maps Datasets External datasets catalogue
File The fourth assessment: Presentation of the report at the Belgrade conference
Subtitled movie of the speech hold by Executive Director of the EEA Jacqueline McGlade during the presentation of the 4th pan-European assessment at the UNECE 6th Мinisterial Conference "Environment for Europe", in Belgrade, 10th of October 2007.
Located in Environmental topics Archive: the Belgrade ministerial conference Videos and interviews
File Expert interview: transport and environment
Peder Jensen, EEA transport and the environment expert. Transport is harmful to the environment in many different ways. The most visible effect of transport is some of the emissions that we see: we can see the exhaust gas coming out of a car and at certain times it's very dirty and very dark. It's a very visible way where it's harming the environment, harming the air that we are all breathing. But there are also effects that are not quite so visible - when we are burning fuel in our engines we are emitting a lot of different gases and some of them are invisible greenhouse gases that help trap the heat in the atmosphere to get the earth to go warmer. One of the other important effects of transport is the noise impact. Noise means that people have a hard time sleeping, that they therefore don't get the rest that they need. It also affects the animals, disturbs their life, if roads or railroads run through nature areas it therefore means a reduced quality of life for both animals and people. Finally, transport infrastructure has a tendency to fragment natural habitats for animals. Lots of animals are disturbed by roads, they cannot cross the road, they are either scared off by the noise or they can't find ways to cross these different infrastructures and this means that the habitats they are living in don't work so well for their reproduction.
Located in Environmental topics Transport Multimedia
File Better and cleaner urban transport for Europe
Urban traffic is responsible for 40% of CO2 road transport emissions. In Europe, 9 citizens out of 10 are exposed to harmful particle emissions that are higher than the tolerated norm. Time wasted in traffic jams will soon cost 1% of the European Union’s GDP. In terms of urban transport, the European Union contributes to financing infrastructures and equipment, but also supports projects aiming at replacing petrol by alternative and clean fuels. Most cities in the EU are putting in place a mix of advanced technologies and transport policy measures, such as alternative traffic management systems to combine mobility and quality of life. The EU cooperates with cities, notably through the CIVITAS network, to favour the exchange of know-how and best practices at European level.
Located in Environmental topics Transport Multimedia
File Giving Europe more breathing space
Air pollution has been one of Europe’s main concerns since the late 1970s. Over the last few decades, the rapid growth in industry and increased reliance on cars and public transport has contributed to a rapid decline in air quality, from smog and acid rain to asthma and other respiratory diseases.
Located in Environmental topics Air pollution Multimedia
Publication Status of black carbon monitoring in ambient air in Europe
This report provides a summary of black carbon (BC) definitions as discussed in the air quality monitoring community. Secondly, it provides a summary of the current status of BC-related monitoring in Europe. Information presented in the report includes an overview of available measurement techniques and associated technical issues, monitoring networks and current data reporting practices.
Located in Publications
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