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You are here: Home / Environmental topics / Climate change / Multimedia

Multimedia

All multimedia about climate change

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Climate change, adaptation is vital

Climate change is one of the biggest environmental, social and economic threats our planet currently faces. Profound changes are about to affect the mechanisms supporting life on earth, and their impact in the next few decades will be considerable.   More

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Ecodriving, a cleaner and cheaper solution

These few simple, practical and free reflexes can be adopted by all drivers. With climate change increasingly in the news and oil prices hitting ever higher records, EcoDriving not only offers the advantage of reducing emissions, but also gives consumers the opportunity to cut their fuel costs by 15 % to 30 %.   More

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Global warning: early warnings on adaptation

Climate change is the ever growing reality faced by the inhabitants of the Arctic regions. They must adapt to the changing landscapes, increasing temperatures, disappearing species, new hunting techniques. In this video, several leaders of indigenous peoples' organizations, represented in the Arctic Council, share their thoughts and concerns about the changes in their lifestyles brought on by the changing climate.   More

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Spreading green consumption tips in Copenhagen

Too often, people think that the responsibility for environmental problems lies solely with industry or policy makers. Yet consumers have an equally important role in environmental matters, as their everyday choices have big impacts on the environment. During the famous Copenhagen Culture Night 2008, the European Environment Agency tackled sustainable consumption issues in a creative way.   More

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Living with Climate change

Global warming is happening. Temperatures have already risen by 0.76 degrees since the industrial revolution and are projected to rise further by 1.8 - 4 degrees by the end of the century. The last time climate change happened at this pace was 125,000 years ago and led to a 4-6 metre sea level rise. Global warming at the upper end of the scale predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change would have catastrophic consequences for Europe. Up to 30% of plant, animal and bird species would be wiped out and the threat of natural disasters such as landslides, floods and mudslides would increase significantly.   More

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Emissions trading - putting a price on carbon

The EU Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) is a world first and a major weapon in Europe's fight against climate change. The innovative system has turned carbon dioxide emissions into a tradeable commodity. They can now be bought and sold like any other of the thousands of products traded on world markets today. The scheme works by placing a limit or a 'cap' on the amount of carbon dioxide participating installations - currently around 10,500 across the European Union - can emit every year. If an installation emits more than its allowance, it must either pay a very hefty fine or buy surplus allowances from companies that have managed to stay below their limit. The system ensures that overall CO2 emissions from the plants covered are cut in the most cost effective way.   More

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Capturing Carbon: A new front in the fight against climate change

Global warming is one of the biggest issues of our time. To meet the targets set for reducing CO2 emissions, it's widely accepted that new technology will play an important role, sometimes as a "bridging technology", while alternative sustainable energy sources are being developed. One of the most promising technologies is Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS). This a means of capturing CO2 from sources such as power plants, compressing the CO2 and storing it away safely in geological formations underground or under the seabed instead of releasing it into the atmosphere.   More

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Curbing CO2 emissions from road transport

Road transport generates about one fifth of the EU's CO2 emissions, with passenger cars responsible for around 12%. This makes it the second most important source of greenhouse gases. Although there have been significant improvements over recent years in vehicle technology, these have not been enough to neutralise the effect of increases in traffic and car size.   More

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Reducing climate impacts from international aviation: Europe leads the way

The European Commission is proposing legislation to bring the aviation sector into the European Union's pioneering emissions trading scheme (EU ETS) in order to control the rapid growth in CO2 emissions from air travel. Until now airlines have not been subject to the constraints on energy consumption or greenhouse gas emissions that other businesses have to live with. Emissions from domestic flights are covered by the Kyoto Protocol's emission targets for developed countries, but international aviation - which makes up the vast majority of flights - is not. In addition, jet fuel for international flights has historically been exempted from taxation. Hence the need for policy action.   More

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Europe leads the fight against climate change

The Earth is rapidly getting warmer, threatening serious and even catastrophic disruption to our societies and to the natural environment on which we depend. Over the course of the 20th century the average temperature increased by around 0.6 C globally, by almost 1 C in Europe and by no less than 5 C in the Arctic. This man-made warming is already having many disruptive effects around the globe. Sea levels are rising as a result of melting glaciers and ice sheets, threatening to flood low-lying communities. Extreme weather conditions; floods, droughts, storms are becoming more severe, more frequent and more costly in some parts of the world. And many endangered species may be pushed to extinction over the coming decades as climate change affects their traditional habitats.   More

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Introduction of the film 'Our Arctic Challenge'

Jacqueline McGlade, Executive Director of the European Environment Agency (EEA), and three of her colleagues have chosen to be part of an extraordinary journey in East Greenland. They travel from their offices in Copenhagen to participate in a multi sport race, where they challenge themselves through 250 kilometers of the Arctic wilderness. On their way they encounter the effects of climate change and its impact on the Arctic environment. The Inuit are among the first people to experience the effects of climate change. They are in the middle of an environmental challenge that will change many parts of their culture. What is happening to the Inuit today will happen to the rest of the world tomorrow. We will all need to adapt to climate change.   More

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Scenery from the Greenlandic landscape

Jacqueline McGlade, Executive Director of the European Environment Agency (EEA), and three of her colleagues have chosen to be part of an extraordinary journey in East Greenland. They travel from their offices in Copenhagen to participate in a multisport race, where they challenge themselves through 250 kilometres of the Arctic wilderness. On their way they encounter the effects of climate change and its impact on the Arctic environment. The Inuit are among the first people to experience the effects of climate change. They are in the middle of an environmental challenge that will change many parts of their culture. What is happening to Inuit's today will happen to the rest of the world tomorrow. We will all need to adapt to climate change.   More

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EEA celebrates Mobility Week 2007! How we fare in environmentally friendly commuting.

In celebration of the European Mobility Week, EEA staff examined its own impact on the environment with daily commuting to work. This video shows a few modes of transportation used by some employees. A recent survey among staff showed that 53 % of them walk or cycle to get to work and many others walk or cycle in combination with public transport.   More

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Prof. Jacqueline McGlade on adapting to the impacts of climate change – speech for the ESPACE initiative

In her speech, Prof. Jacqueline McGlade, Executive Director of the European Environment Agency (EEA), stresses the importance of imbedding climate change into planning systems and processes. ESPACE (European Spatial Planning: Adapting to Climate Events) is a four-year European project promoting the importance of adapting the entire planning process to the impacts of climate change.   More

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Halting the loss of biodiversity by 2010 – Are we on target?

The European Union has set an objective to halt the loss of biodiversity by 2010. Europe is currently suffering from a steady loss of biodiversity, with profound consequences for the natural world and for human well-being. The main causes are changes in natural habitats and these, in turn, are due to intensive agricultural production systems, construction, quarrying, overexploitation of forests, oceans, rivers, lakes and soils, alien species invasions, pollution and — increasingly — global warming.   More

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“If I were President of Europe…” – just what would you do to help the environment?

Students from the Copenhagen International School answer to the question “If you were the President of Europe, what would you do to help decrease pollution and improve our environment?”. Increasing taxes on cars and using that money to invest in environmentally-friendly forms of transportation are the most cited policies a green President would implement.   More

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What are the environmental concerns of Europe’s future policy makers?

Curious as to how the future policy-makers and voters feel about Europe's environment, the EEA interviewed young Europeans at the first ever Youth Summit organised by the European Commission. The event was part of the celebrations of the 50th anniversary of the Rome Treaty. More environmental education, alternative sources of energy and stricter transportation laws are some of the proposals put forth by the youth.   More

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Celebrating Europe and its environment – past successes, future challenges. Interview with EEA’s executive director Prof. Jacqueline McGlade

2007 marks the 50th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome. In this interview, EEA’s executive director Prof. Jacqueline McGlade looks back at the last 50 years of Europe’s environmental policy and reflects on the challenges that still lie ahead.   More

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Water and hydroelectric power

Although hydroelectric power stations create power from a reusable resource, there are some concerns about their impact on water. They alter the flow and temperature regimes that destroy fish spawning areas, handicap fish migration, kill fish in turbines and dry out wetlands. They can also capture sediment and nutrients behind dams, which can reduce the fertility of the waters downstream and may also increase erosion of river banks. For instance dams have reduced the sediment carried into Lake Geneva by some 50 %. Climate change could also make many hydroelectric power plants less reliable in future as water availability changes. While some plants in northern Europe could generate more power, hydroelectric dams in Bulgaria, Portugal, Spain, Turkey and Ukraine could reduce output by 20-50 % because of declining rainfall. Source: State of the Environment Report No 1/2005 "The European environment - State and outlook 2005" (published 29 Nov 2005)   More

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Carbon uptake by forests

(This video has no audio.) The uptake of carbon from the atmosphere by natural vegetation, soils, forests and agricultural land ('terrestrial biosphere') is an important part of the carbon cycle. Carbon uptake by vegetation can lessen the increasing concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere and in Europe can be increased by planting forests and other land management measures. But the additional potential storage capacity for the EU in forestry and agriculture is estimated to be relatively small, and climate change may cause more fires, pests and storm damage as well as increasing water stress, particularly in the Mediterranean area. These conditions would curtail plant growth and reduce the amount of carbon stored in the biosphere. Source: EEA Report No 2/2004 "Impacts of Europe's changing climate" (published 18 Aug 2004)   More

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