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All multimedia about climate change

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Europe leads the fight against climate change

The Earth is rapidly getting warmer, threatening serious and even catastrophic disruption to our societies and to the natural environment on which we depend. Over the course of the 20th century the average temperature increased by around 0.6 C globally, by almost 1 C in Europe and by no less than 5 C in the Arctic. This man-made warming is already having many disruptive effects around the globe. Sea levels are rising as a result of melting glaciers and ice sheets, threatening to flood low-lying communities. Extreme weather conditions; floods, droughts, storms are becoming more severe, more frequent and more costly in some parts of the world. And many endangered species may be pushed to extinction over the coming decades as climate change affects their traditional habitats.   More

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Introduction of the film 'Our Arctic Challenge'

Jacqueline McGlade, Executive Director of the European Environment Agency (EEA), and three of her colleagues have chosen to be part of an extraordinary journey in East Greenland. They travel from their offices in Copenhagen to participate in a multi sport race, where they challenge themselves through 250 kilometers of the Arctic wilderness. On their way they encounter the effects of climate change and its impact on the Arctic environment. The Inuit are among the first people to experience the effects of climate change. They are in the middle of an environmental challenge that will change many parts of their culture. What is happening to the Inuit today will happen to the rest of the world tomorrow. We will all need to adapt to climate change.   More

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Scenery from the Greenlandic landscape

Jacqueline McGlade, Executive Director of the European Environment Agency (EEA), and three of her colleagues have chosen to be part of an extraordinary journey in East Greenland. They travel from their offices in Copenhagen to participate in a multisport race, where they challenge themselves through 250 kilometres of the Arctic wilderness. On their way they encounter the effects of climate change and its impact on the Arctic environment. The Inuit are among the first people to experience the effects of climate change. They are in the middle of an environmental challenge that will change many parts of their culture. What is happening to Inuit's today will happen to the rest of the world tomorrow. We will all need to adapt to climate change.   More

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EEA celebrates Mobility Week 2007! How we fare in environmentally friendly commuting.

In celebration of the European Mobility Week, EEA staff examined its own impact on the environment with daily commuting to work. This video shows a few modes of transportation used by some employees. A recent survey among staff showed that 53 % of them walk or cycle to get to work and many others walk or cycle in combination with public transport.   More

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Prof. Jacqueline McGlade on adapting to the impacts of climate change – speech for the ESPACE initiative

In her speech, Prof. Jacqueline McGlade, Executive Director of the European Environment Agency (EEA), stresses the importance of imbedding climate change into planning systems and processes. ESPACE (European Spatial Planning: Adapting to Climate Events) is a four-year European project promoting the importance of adapting the entire planning process to the impacts of climate change.   More

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Halting the loss of biodiversity by 2010 – Are we on target?

The European Union has set an objective to halt the loss of biodiversity by 2010. Europe is currently suffering from a steady loss of biodiversity, with profound consequences for the natural world and for human well-being. The main causes are changes in natural habitats and these, in turn, are due to intensive agricultural production systems, construction, quarrying, overexploitation of forests, oceans, rivers, lakes and soils, alien species invasions, pollution and — increasingly — global warming.   More

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“If I were President of Europe…” – just what would you do to help the environment?

Students from the Copenhagen International School answer to the question “If you were the President of Europe, what would you do to help decrease pollution and improve our environment?”. Increasing taxes on cars and using that money to invest in environmentally-friendly forms of transportation are the most cited policies a green President would implement.   More

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What are the environmental concerns of Europe’s future policy makers?

Curious as to how the future policy-makers and voters feel about Europe's environment, the EEA interviewed young Europeans at the first ever Youth Summit organised by the European Commission. The event was part of the celebrations of the 50th anniversary of the Rome Treaty. More environmental education, alternative sources of energy and stricter transportation laws are some of the proposals put forth by the youth.   More

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Celebrating Europe and its environment – past successes, future challenges. Interview with EEA’s executive director Prof. Jacqueline McGlade

2007 marks the 50th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome. In this interview, EEA’s executive director Prof. Jacqueline McGlade looks back at the last 50 years of Europe’s environmental policy and reflects on the challenges that still lie ahead.   More

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Water and hydroelectric power

Although hydroelectric power stations create power from a reusable resource, there are some concerns about their impact on water. They alter the flow and temperature regimes that destroy fish spawning areas, handicap fish migration, kill fish in turbines and dry out wetlands. They can also capture sediment and nutrients behind dams, which can reduce the fertility of the waters downstream and may also increase erosion of river banks. For instance dams have reduced the sediment carried into Lake Geneva by some 50 %. Climate change could also make many hydroelectric power plants less reliable in future as water availability changes. While some plants in northern Europe could generate more power, hydroelectric dams in Bulgaria, Portugal, Spain, Turkey and Ukraine could reduce output by 20-50 % because of declining rainfall. Source: State of the Environment Report No 1/2005 "The European environment - State and outlook 2005" (published 29 Nov 2005)   More

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Carbon uptake by forests

(This video has no audio.) The uptake of carbon from the atmosphere by natural vegetation, soils, forests and agricultural land ('terrestrial biosphere') is an important part of the carbon cycle. Carbon uptake by vegetation can lessen the increasing concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere and in Europe can be increased by planting forests and other land management measures. But the additional potential storage capacity for the EU in forestry and agriculture is estimated to be relatively small, and climate change may cause more fires, pests and storm damage as well as increasing water stress, particularly in the Mediterranean area. These conditions would curtail plant growth and reduce the amount of carbon stored in the biosphere. Source: EEA Report No 2/2004 "Impacts of Europe's changing climate" (published 18 Aug 2004)   More

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Extreme weather variations with climate change

(This video has no audio.) In the past decade Europe has been affected by three remarkable weather extremes. The summers of 1995 and 2003 were extremely hot throughout most parts of Europe. In contrast, 2002 was very wet and saw extreme flooding in central Europe. Changes are also projected for the amount of rainfall in Europe, which could more pronounced flooding. Cold winters (which occurred once every 10 years from 1961 to 1990) are likely to become rare and will almost entirely disappear by 2080. In contrast, by 2080 nearly every summer in many parts of Europe is projected to be hotter than the 10 % hottest summers in the current climate. In southern Europe, these changes are projected to occur even earlier (in Spain by the 2020s) (Parry, 2000). This could have severe consequences for agriculture, water resources and the frequency of forest fires in southern Europe. Source: EEA Report No 2/2004 "Impacts of Europe's changing climate" (published 18 Aug 2004)   More

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Rising snowline in the Alps

(This video has no audio.) It is estimated that, as global warming proceeds, regions currently receiving snowfall will increasingly receive precipitation in the form of rain. For every 1ºC increase in temperature, the snowline rises by about 150 metres. As a result, less snow will accumulate at low elevations. As a consequence, nearly half of all ski resorts in Switzerland, and even more in Germany, Austria and the Pyrenees, will face difficulties in attracting tourists and winter sport enthusiasts in the future. Source: EEA Report No 2/2004 "Impacts of Europe's changing climate" (published 18 Aug 2004)   More

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Effects of climate change

In the past 100 years, the number of cold and frost days has decreased in most parts of Europe, whereas the number of days with temperatures above 25°C and the number of heatwaves have increased. The frequency of very wet days has significantly decreased in recent decades in many places in southern Europe, but increased in mid and northern Europe. Cold winters are projected to disappear almost entirely by 2080 and hot summers are projected to become much more frequent. This will have a continuing effect on mountain regions. For every 1°C increase in temperature, the snowline rises by 150 metres. And by 2050, three-quarters of today's glaciers in parts of the Alps are expected to have disappeared. Source: State of the Environment Report No 1/2005 "The European environment - State and outlook 2005" (published 29 Nov 2005)   More

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Ozone: fluctuations over 15 years

This video shows the projected difference in the 'ozone hole' over the arctic between the year 2000 and 2015. Source: Animation form 'Global animations'   More

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Emissions trading

(This video has audio) An explanation of emissions trading. Source: EU Emissions Trading - An Open Scheme Promoting Global Innovation to Combat Climate Change (Nov. 2004), by the EU Publications Office   More

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Projected evolution of F-gas emissions from all emission sources in the EU-27in 1995-2050 in the scenario “without measures”

Figure 2: Projected evolution of F-gas emissions from all emission sources in the EU-27 in 1995-2050 in the scenario “without measures” (i.e. without EU F-gas policies), the scenario “with measures” (i.e. initial EU F-gas policy) and additional measures (i.e. the new F-gas policy). Source: European Commission   More

European Environment Agency (EEA)
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