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Air pollution - Drivers and pressures (Sweden)

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This content has been archived on 21 Mar 2015, reason: A new version has been published
Key drivers and pressures of air pollution. Links to further national information on air pollution.
Topic
Air pollution Air pollution
more info
Swedish Environmental Protection Agency
Organisation name
Swedish Environmental Protection Agency
Reporting country
Sweden
Organisation website
Organisation website
Contact link
Contact link
Last updated
23 Sep 2011
Content license
CC By 2.5
Content provider
Swedish Environmental Protection Agency
Published: 23 Oct 2010 Modified: 21 Mar 2015 Feed synced: 23 Sep 2011 original
Key message

Important sources of air pollution are road traffic, energy production, industry and shipping. To a large extent, long-distance transport impacts ozone concentrations.

c) What are the related key drivers (D) and pressures (P) at national level?

Important sources of air pollution are road traffic, energy production, industry and shipping. With respect to PM10, the main cause of high concentrations is road-wear particles generated by the use of studded tyres. Shipping has a major impact on both the concentration and deposition of nitrogen and sulphur and thereby affects water, air and land environments. Twenty-five percent of the atmospheric fallout of nitrogen over the Baltic Sea comes from international shipping. To a large extent, long-distance transport impacts ozone concentrations.

Sources outside Sweden are important

The concentrations of particulates (PM2.5) are affected by exhaust emissions and long-range transboundary pollution. In South Sweden more than 50 % of the anthropogenic PM2.5 present in ambient air monitored in regional background originates from sources outside Sweden. Despite the low concentrations, it is important that measures be implemented, both nationally and internationally, so that the population’s exposure to PM2.5 diminishes to improve citizens’ health. It has not been possible to establish a threshold under which no health effects arise.
 

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The country assessments are the sole responsibility of the EEA member and cooperating countries supported by the EEA through guidance, translation and editing.

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