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Publication Energy and environment in the European Union - Tracking progress towards integration
Indicator-based report to measure progress of environmental integration within the energy sector.
Located in Publications
Publication Europe's ecological backbone: recognising the true value of our mountains
Europe's mountain areas have social, economic and environmental capital of significance for the entire continent. This importance has been recognised since the late 19th century through national legislation; since the 1970s through regional structures for cooperation; and since the 1990s through regional legal instruments for the Alps and Carpathians. The European Union (EU) first recognised the specific characteristics of mountain areas in 1975 through the designation of Less Favoured Areas (LFAs). During the last decade, EU cohesion policy and the Treaty of Lisbon have both focused specifically on mountains.
Located in Publications
Data Freshwater Abstraction and hydropower – Dataset for WISE Map Layer
This dataset includes the data used for production of WISE map layers for annual freshwater abstraction, use for hydropower and cooling water as well as data on population per country or river basin district (RBD) used for the normalisation.
Located in Data and maps Datasets
Figure Hydropower in Europe: technically exploitable capacity and actual generation in 2005
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Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Octet Stream Projected changes in hydropower production in Scandinavia
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
File Water and hydroelectric power
Although hydroelectric power stations create power from a reusable resource, there are some concerns about their impact on water. They alter the flow and temperature regimes that destroy fish spawning areas, handicap fish migration, kill fish in turbines and dry out wetlands. They can also capture sediment and nutrients behind dams, which can reduce the fertility of the waters downstream and may also increase erosion of river banks. For instance dams have reduced the sediment carried into Lake Geneva by some 50 %. Climate change could also make many hydroelectric power plants less reliable in future as water availability changes. While some plants in northern Europe could generate more power, hydroelectric dams in Bulgaria, Portugal, Spain, Turkey and Ukraine could reduce output by 20-50 % because of declining rainfall. Source: State of the Environment Report No 1/2005 "The European environment - State and outlook 2005" (published 29 Nov 2005)
Located in Environmental topics Climate change Multimedia
Publication Water resources: quantity and flows - SOER 2010 thematic assessment
Europe's freshwaters are affected by water scarcity, droughts, floods and physical modifications. Many water bodies are at risk of failing to meet the aim of the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) to achieve good status by 2015. Future policies should encourage demand management through actions such as increasing water efficiency. In addition, water management will benefit from applying an ecosystems perspective, using floodplains and groundwater aquifers for storing water, and making room (space) for rivers.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Thematic assessments
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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