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You are here: Home / The European environment – state and outlook 2010
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GIS Map Application Ammonium in groundwater by countries and WFD gw bodies Mean annual concentrations of Ammonium (NH4) measured at WISE SoE groundwater
The map shows the mean annual concentrations of Ammonium (NH4) measured at WISE SoE groundwater monitoring stations during the period 2000 – 2011. All data are annual means aggregated by countries (visible when the map is zoomed to the scale of 1 : 6 000 001 and less detailed) or by WFD groundwater bodies (visible when the map is zoomed to the scale of 1 : 6 000 000 and more detailed).
Located in Data and maps Interactive maps
Figure Annual average national groundwater nitrate (mg/l NO3) by concentration class, 2008
The map shows the annual average groundwater nitrate concentrations in different European countries.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
File Ask an expert on ground water
Pavla Chyská- EEA expert on Water, Ground water "Ground water is a very important element of the earth's hydrological cycle. It comes from rain and snow melt that seeps into the grounds. Its hidden below the earth's surface and, compared with rivers and lakes, it receives less attention from people but its influence on our lives is enormous. Ground water is very important because it's a vital part of the eco-systems on our planet and, yes, life exists in ground water too. Many water eco-systems like springs, rivers and streams depend on it. Ground water is also a major source of water for people and especially quality drinking water. In Europe as a whole, about 65% of public water supply is provided by ground water."
Located in Environmental topics Biodiversity Multimedia
Daviz Visualization Average concentrations of nutrients in European groundwater and surface waters (1992-2011)
Located in Data and maps Data visualisations
Indicator Assessment chemical/x-pdb Chemical status (WFD 002) - Assessment DRAFT created Apr 2013
This indicator summarises the results from the Water Framework (WFD) River  Basin Management Plans (RBMP) on chemical status of groundwater and surface waters. The results should be interpreted cautiously, since chemical monitoring as reported in the first RBMPs was incomplete, and information is not always comparable between Member States.  The results from the first showed: Poor chemical status for groundwater, by area, is about 25 % across Europe. A total of 16 Member States have more than 10 % of groundwater bodies in poor chemical status; this figure exceeds 50 % in four Member States. Excessive levels of nitrate are the most frequent cause of poor groundwater status across much of Europe.   Poor chemical status for rivers, lakes, and transitional and coastal waters does not exceed 10 %, aggregated across Europe as a whole. Notably, the chemical status of many of Europe’s surface waters remains unknown, ranging between one third of lakes and more than half of transitional waters. A total of 10 Member States report poor chemical status in more than 20 % of rivers and lakes with known chemical status, whilst this figure rises to above 40 % in five Member States. A total of 10 Member States report poor chemical status in more than 20 % of rivers and lakes with known chemical status, whilst this figure rises to above 40 % in five Member States.   Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a widespread cause of poor status in rivers. Heavy metals are also a significant contributor to poor status in rivers and lakes, with levels of mercury in Swedish freshwater biota causing 100 % failure to reach good chemical status. Industrial chemicals such as the plasticiser di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and pesticides also constitute widespread causes of poor chemical status in rivers.  Six Member States report poor chemical status in transitional waters to be more than 50 % of the water bodies with known chemical status. PAHs, the antifouling biocide tributyltin (TBT) and heavy metals are the most common culprits.  Six Member States report all their coastal waters as having good chemical status, although in five others, poor chemical status exceeds 90 % of those water bodies with a known chemical status. A variety of pollutant groups contribute to poor status in coastal waters, reflecting a diverse range of sources.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Chemical status
Figure Chemical status of groundwater bodies
The graphs illustrate the chemical status of groundwater, Percentage of groundwater bodies in poor and good status, by area.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Daviz Visualization Contaminants affecting soil and groundwater in Europe
Located in Data and maps Data visualisations
Country profile D source code Country profile - Distinguishing factors (Finland)
Country introduction - Factors that distinguish Finland from many others
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Country assessments Finland
Figure Distribution of chemical status of groundwater, rivers, lakes, transitional and coastal waters.
Number of Member States contributing to the dataset: Groundwater (26); Rivers (25); Lakes (22); Transitional (15) and Coastal (20). Percentages shown for rivers, lakes, transitional and coastal are by water body count. Groundwater percentages, however, are expressed by area. The total number of water bodies is shown in parenthesis. Data from Sweden are excluded from surface water data illustrated in the figure. This is because Sweden contributed a disproportionately large amount of data and, classified all its surface waters as poor status since levels of mercury found within biota in both fresh and coastal waters exceed quality standards.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Press Release Europe needs to use water more efficiently
Europe needs to redouble efforts in using water more efficiently to avoid undermining its economy, according to a new report from the European Environment Agency (EEA). Inefficient water use impacts hard on the resources needed by ecosystems and people, both vital assets for European productivity and security.
Located in Media News
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