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Figure text/texmacs Area of damaged forest and other wooded land by biotic agents
Data: Albania, Austria, Bulgaria, Cyprus (partly), Czech Republic (partly), Estonia, Finland, France (partly), Hungary, Italy, Norway (partly), Portugal (partly), Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, Turkey (partly), the United Kingdom
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Areas of possible establishment of Aedes albopictus (the tiger mosquito) in Europe for 2010 and 2030
Developed by Francis Schaffner (BioSys Consultancy, Zurich), in partnership with Guy Hendrickx/Ernst-Jan Scholte (AviaGIS, Zoersel, Belgium) and Jolyon M Medlock (Health Protection Agency, United Kingdom) for the ECDC TigerMaps project
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure D source code Areas of possible establishment of Aedes albopictus (the tiger mosquito) in Europe for 2010 and 2030
Developed by Francis Schaffner (BioSys Consultancy, Zurich), in partnership with Guy Hendrickx/Ernst-Jan Scholte (AviaGIS, Zoersel, Belgium) and Jolyon M Medlock (Health Protection Agency, United Kingdom) for the ECDC TigerMaps project
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Change in the distribution of Aedes albopictus in Europe
Areas marked as ‘2011’ indicate that the tiger mosquito was detected in 2011 for the first time. They include areas of known geographical expansion of A. albopictus in France, northern Italy and Spain where vector surveillance has been in place since 2008 but also areas in Albania, Greece, and central and southern Italy, where the first detection of the vector in 2011 could be the result of increased vector surveillance rather than actual geographical expansion. ‘2008–2010’ refers to all areas where the vector has been present before 2011. Indoor presence corresponds to the presence recorded in greenhouses.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Briefing C source code header Changing disease burdens and risks of pandemics (GMT 3)
Located in SOER 2015 — The European environment — state and outlook 2015 Global megatrends
Figure Climatic suitability for the mosquitos Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus in Europe
This figure shows the climatic suitability for the mosquitos Aedes aegypti (left) and Aedes albopictus (right) in Europe. Darker to lighter green indicates conditions not suitable for the vector whereas yellow to red colours indicate conditions that are increasingly suitable for the vector. Grey indicates that no prediction is possible.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
SOER Key fact Disease burdens and the risk of new pandemics
The risk of exposure to new, emerging and re-emerging diseases, to accidents and new pandemics, grows with increasing mobility of people and goods, climate change and poverty. Vulnerable Europeans could be severely affected.
Located in The European environment — state and outlook 2015 SOER 2010 — assessment of global megatrends Key facts
File Disease burdens and the risk of new pandemics — global megatrend 3
Located in The European environment — state and outlook 2015 Global megatrends SOER 2010 — assessment of global megatrends
Figure Environmental factors and conflicts possibly causing migration
Colors show Human development Index ranking. Symbols locate possible causes of displacements: environmental upheavals related to climate change and major conflicts since 2000.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure European distribution of Borrelia burgdorferi in questing I. ricinus ticks
The risks described in this figure are relative to each other according to a standard distribution scale. Risk is defined as the probability of finding nymphal ticks positive for Borrelia burgdorferi. For each prevalence quartile, associated climate traits were used to produce a qualitative evaluation of risk according to Office International des Epizooties (OIE) standards at five levels (high, moderate, low, negligible, and null), which directly correlate with the probability of finding nymphal ticks with prevalence in the four quartiles.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100