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You are here: Home / The European environment – state and outlook 2010
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Figure Coastline dynamics in Europe
The map and the graph show the coastal erosion patterns in Europe (2004)
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Highlight chemical/x-mdl-rdfile Soil protection critical for Europe's economy and ecosystems
Soil is one of the planet's invaluable resources but continues to be degraded in Europe. Together, the mineral particles, water, air, organic matter, and living organisms that constitute soil perform key functions which underpin our society.
Located in News
Figure Projected impacts of climate change on freshwater flows
The map shows mean variation in annual run-off in 1981-2000 and 2081-2100
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Water erosion risk. Baseline projection to 2030
Location of areas of high risk(red), moderate risk (orange) and low risk (white)of water erosion.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure PostScript document Erosion rate in the Alps
The Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) was applied to the whole alpine area. The model calculates annual soil loss (t ha-1 yr-1) based on Rainfall Erosivity Factor (MJ mm ha-1 h-1 yr, Soil Erodibility Factor (t ha h ha-1 MJ-1 mm-1, Slope length Factor (dimensionless), Slope Factor (dimensionless), Cover Management Factor (dimensionless), Human Practices aimed at erosion control. The output grid cell is 100
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Publication Soil — SOER 2010 thematic assessment
Nearly all of the food and fibres used by humans are produced on soil. Soil is also essential for water and ecosystem health. It is second only to the oceans as a global carbon sink, with an important role in the potential slowing of climate change. Soil functions depend on a multitude of soil organisms which makes it an important part of our biodiversity. Nevertheless, soil in many parts of Europe is being over-exploited, degraded and irreversibly lost due to impacts from industrial activities and land use change, leading to soil sealing, contamination, erosion and loss of organic carbon. Due to these problems, legislation for the protection of soils has been proposed at EU level.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Thematic assessments
SOER Message Soil — key message 3
Soil erosion by wind and water, largely the result of unsuitable land management, deforestation, overgrazing, construction activities and forest fires, affects around 17% of Europe’s land area. Erosion rates and extents are expected to continue to reflect changing patterns of land use and climate change.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Soil — SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
Figure Impact of coastal erosion on Natura 2000 sites, 2009
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Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Folder Photos
Located in The Environmental Atlas Environmental Atlas of Europe Windbreaks
File Octet Stream Windbreaks: Environmental Atlas of Europe - Georgia
During the Soviet era, Dedoplistskaro in south east Georgia was the country’s main production area for wheat and sunflower seeds. That came to an end in 1991 when Georgia became independent and Russia cut off its energy supply. To survive the cold winters, the people resorted to cutting down trees for firewood, stripping the countryside of the windbreaks that protected the crops and soil from the harsh desert winds and provided a natural habitat for many species of animals and plants.
Located in The Environmental Atlas Windbreaks Video
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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