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File C source code header Air quality and health
(Transcription of audio on video) Europe loses 200 million working days a year to air pollution-related illness. The air pollutants that affect the respiratory system are ozone, nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide, and particulate matter. The breathing in of fine particulate matter significantly increases the numbers of deaths from cardiovascular and cardiopulmonary diseases. Over a third of particulate matter comes from domestic wood stoves, another third from industrial sources, and the remainder from transport and agriculture. Ground level ozone, one of the components of smog and produced through vehicle exhaust and industrial emissions, also has severe implications for respiratory health. The European Commission Clean Air for Europe programme found that in the year 2000 around 350,000 people were dying prematurely due to outdoor pollution of fine particulate matter alone. Although levels of particulate matter and ozone have both been reducing in recent decades, estimates indicate that 20 million Europeans suffer from respiratory problems. Source: The European environment - State and outlook 2005
Located in Environmental topics Environment and health Multimedia
Infographic D source code How are the environment and our well-being and health connected?
Natural resources fuel our production and consumption, and create wealth and jobs, contributing to our quality of life and well-being. But our level of resource consumption is undermining our ecosystems’ capacity to provide for us in the future.
Located in Media Infographics
File application/vnd.symbian.install Climate change — SOER synthesis chapter 2
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Synthesis The European environment – state and outlook 2010: Synthesis
File Environment, health and quality of life — SOER synthesis chapter 5
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Synthesis The European environment – state and outlook 2010: Synthesis
Figure Percentage of urban population resident in areas where pollutant concentrations are higher than selected limit/target values, 2001-2010 (EU-27)
The rationale for selection of pollutant and corresponding limit/target values for CSI 004 is given in the justification for indicator selection. Only urban and sub-urban background monitoring stations have been included in the calculations. Data for Cyprus, Luxembourg and Malta, are not included due to the geographical coverage of the Urban Audit.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure 1-hydroxypyrene (1-HP) in urine of never smokers in Germany (geometric mean, 95 % CI)
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Infographic Many Europeans are exposed to harmful levels of air pollution
Up to a third of Europeans living in cities are exposed to air pollutant levels exceeding EU air quality standards. And around 90 % of Europeans living in cities are exposed to levels of air pollutants deemed damaging to health by the World Health Organization’s more stringent guidelines.
Located in Media Infographics
File Troff document Datasheet — Revealing the costs of air pollution from industrial facilities in Europe
Located in Publications Revealing the costs of air pollution from industrial facilities in Europe
Publication text/x-sh Hazardous substances in Europe's fresh and marine waters — An overview
Chemicals are an essential part of our daily lives and are used to produce consumer goods, to protect or restore our health and to boost food production, to name but a few examples. Some chemicals, however, are hazardous, raising concerns for the environment and human health. Hazardous substances are emitted to fresh and marine waters via a number of pathways and can have detrimental effects on aquatic biota. Humans can be exposed to hazardous substances in water through the ingestion of contaminated drinking water and the consumption of contaminated freshwater fish and seafood. A wide range of legislation now exists in Europe to address the release of hazardous substances to the environment, including water. New challenges exist, however, including the issues of chemical mixtures and emerging pollutants.
Located in Publications
File Summary for policymakers — Revealing the costs of air pollution from industrial facilities in Europe
Located in Publications Revealing the costs of air pollution from industrial facilities in Europe
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