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Sound and independent information
on the environment

Climate refugees

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climate refugees
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  • Climate change is seriously affecting the people of the Sundarbans. Located at the mouth of the Ganges River in Bangladesh and West Bengal in India, this area is part of the largest delta in the world. Sundarban means ‘beautiful forest’ in Bengali as the region is covered in mangrove forests. © Image: Mikkel Stenbæk Hansen Click to view full-size image… 423.3 KB
  • A rising sea level, shorter but heavier monsoons, increased tidal surges and more frequent hurricanes are just some of the effects of climate change posing a threat to the area and its inhabitants. © Image: Mikkel Stenbæk Hansen Click to view full-size image… 294.2 KB
  • Over the past 20 years, four islands have disappeared into the sea, leaving 6,000 people homeless. © Image: Mikkel Stenbæk Hansen Click to view full-size image… 143.6 KB
  • Ruhul Khan has lost three houses in recent years. His former homes were located to the left of the picture, an area now covered by water. © Image: Mikkel Stenbæk Hansen Click to view full-size image… 415.1 KB
  • Basand Jana and his family used to live on Lohachara Island, before the sea level rose. On Lohachara they had their own farm and fishing business, but are now reduced to labouring on other people’s farms. © Image: Mikkel Stenbæk Hansen Click to view full-size image… 152.3 KB
  • There’s often no help from the government, but action is being taken locally. People have started building embankments and bamboo fences to protect their villages and fields from the sea. © Image: Mikkel Stenbæk Hansen Click to view full-size image… 500.2 KB
  • The rising sea level brings salt water inland, damaging the soil’s fertility. Some residents have adapted by using their farmland for fish breeding. Others are experimenting with crop species that are resilient to salt water. © Image: Mikkel Stenbæk Hansen Click to view full-size image… 345.6 KB
  • Drought is another problem that the inhabitants of the Sundarbans are facing. Not only is sea water damaging the reservoirs, but there are longer periods with no rain. People now have to travel greater distances to collect drinking water for their families. © Image: Mikkel Stenbæk Hansen Click to view full-size image… 135.9 KB
  • If radical changes aren’t made soon, these children can expect to face even worse impacts of climate change when they grow up. © Image: Mikkel Stenbæk Hansen Click to view full-size image… 214.2 KB
  • Helping poor communities adapt to climate change is a global responsibility. By transferring knowledge and assisting them financially we can enable people to remain in their own regions, and minimise the future numbers of climate refugees. © Image: Mikkel Stenbæk Hansen Click to view full-size image… 26.7 MB
  • All over the world people are having to look at ways of protecting themselves against the impact of climate change. Where will our water come from? Will there be new diseases? How will we protect ourselves from extreme weather? Like the people of the Sundurbans, we must begin to adapt now. © Image: Mikkel Stenbæk Hansen Click to view full-size image… 83.0 KB

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European Environment Agency (EEA)
Kongens Nytorv 6
1050 Copenhagen K
Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100