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Figure Proportion of classified surface water bodies in different RBDs holding less than good ecological status or potential, for rivers and lakes
The figure shows percentage of the total number of classified water bodies.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
GIS Map Application Ammonium in groundwater by countries and WFD gw bodies Mean annual concentrations of Ammonium (NH4) measured at WISE SoE groundwater
The map shows the mean annual concentrations of Ammonium (NH4) measured at WISE SoE groundwater monitoring stations during the period 2000 – 2011. All data are annual means aggregated by countries (visible when the map is zoomed to the scale of 1 : 6 000 001 and less detailed) or by WFD groundwater bodies (visible when the map is zoomed to the scale of 1 : 6 000 000 and more detailed).
Located in Data and maps Interactive maps
GIS Map Application Nitrates in groundwater by countries and WFD gw bodies
The map shows the mean annual concentrations of Nitrates (NO3) measured at WISE SoE groundwater monitoring stations during the period 2000 – 2011. All data are annual means aggregated by countries (visible when the map is zoomed to the scale of 1 : 6 000 001 and less detailed) or by WFD groundwater bodies (visible when the map is zoomed to the scale of 1 : 6 000 000 and more detailed).
Located in Data and maps Interactive maps
Figure Proportion of classified water bodies in different RBDs affected by pollution pressures, for rivers and lakes (left panel) and for coastal and transitional waters (right panel)
The percentage is based on total number of classified water bodies. See the indicator specification for more details.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Publication Assessment of cost recovery through pricing of water
The main objective of this study is to provide practical knowledge on the current status of the implementation of key principles of Article 9 of the Water Framework Directive (WFD), and in particular on the cost‑recovery principle.
Located in Publications
Highlight River Rhine commended for river basin management
The River Rhine has won the first ever International River Foundation (IRF) European River Prize, which is given for remarkable achievements in integrated river basin management. The other finalists were the Órbigo River in Spain, the Upper Drau in Austria, and the Mura-Drava-Danube in Central Europe.
Located in News
Data Waterbase - Emissions to water
Emissions to water are an important element (describing the pressure) in assessment of the state of Europe’s environment (SoE). This database contains data on emissions of nutrients and hazardous substances to water, aggregated within River Basin Districts (RBDs), in the EEA member countries. The reporting process, endorsed by the Water Directors, and this publication of the data, enables all stakeholders to use the data and contributes to streamlining with other reporting processes.
Located in Data and maps Datasets
Data WISE Groundwater
A GWB is defined in WFD Art. 2 as a distinct volume of groundwater within an aquifer or aquifers, whereas an aquifer is defined as a geological layer with significant groundwater flow. This definition of a GWB allows a wide scope of interpretations. The submission of GWB data to the Commission by the EU Member States was accomplished via the Reportnet platform, as a part of the dataflow for WFD. Art. 13 reporting. GWB data includes spatial data as GIS polygons and GWB characteristics in an XML schema. GWBs are registered to so-called horizons, which represent distinct vertical layers of groundwater resources.
Located in Data and maps Datasets
Indicator Assessment chemical/x-pdb Impacts and pressures (WFD 001) - Assessment DRAFT created Apr 2013
The pressures reported to affect most surface water bodies are pollution from diffuse sources causing nutrient enrichment, and hydromorphological pressures causing altered habitats. Lakes are generally least affected by pressures and their impacts. Pollution from diffuse sources is reported for a larger proportion of water bodies than pollution from point sources for all water categories except transitional waters. The highest proportion of water bodies affected by hydromorphological pressures and altered habitats impact is found for rivers. 
Located in Data and maps Indicators Impacts and pressures
Indicator Assessment chemical/x-pdb Chemical status (WFD 002) - Assessment DRAFT created Apr 2013
This indicator summarises the results from the Water Framework (WFD) River  Basin Management Plans (RBMP) on chemical status of groundwater and surface waters. The results should be interpreted cautiously, since chemical monitoring as reported in the first RBMPs was incomplete, and information is not always comparable between Member States.  The results from the first showed: Poor chemical status for groundwater, by area, is about 25 % across Europe. A total of 16 Member States have more than 10 % of groundwater bodies in poor chemical status; this figure exceeds 50 % in four Member States. Excessive levels of nitrate are the most frequent cause of poor groundwater status across much of Europe.   Poor chemical status for rivers, lakes, and transitional and coastal waters does not exceed 10 %, aggregated across Europe as a whole. Notably, the chemical status of many of Europe’s surface waters remains unknown, ranging between one third of lakes and more than half of transitional waters. A total of 10 Member States report poor chemical status in more than 20 % of rivers and lakes with known chemical status, whilst this figure rises to above 40 % in five Member States. A total of 10 Member States report poor chemical status in more than 20 % of rivers and lakes with known chemical status, whilst this figure rises to above 40 % in five Member States.   Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a widespread cause of poor status in rivers. Heavy metals are also a significant contributor to poor status in rivers and lakes, with levels of mercury in Swedish freshwater biota causing 100 % failure to reach good chemical status. Industrial chemicals such as the plasticiser di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and pesticides also constitute widespread causes of poor chemical status in rivers.  Six Member States report poor chemical status in transitional waters to be more than 50 % of the water bodies with known chemical status. PAHs, the antifouling biocide tributyltin (TBT) and heavy metals are the most common culprits.  Six Member States report all their coastal waters as having good chemical status, although in five others, poor chemical status exceeds 90 % of those water bodies with a known chemical status. A variety of pollutant groups contribute to poor status in coastal waters, reflecting a diverse range of sources.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Chemical status
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