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Publication Air pollution — SOER 2010 thematic assessment
Emissions of air pollutants derive from almost all economic and societal activities. They result in clear risks to human health and ecosystems. In Europe, policies and actions at all levels have greatly reduced anthropogenic emissions and exposure but some air pollutants still harm human health. Similarly, as emissions of acidifying pollutants have reduced, the situation for Europe's rivers and lakes has improved but atmospheric nitrogen oversupply still threatens biodiversity in sensitive terrestrial and water ecosystems. The movement of atmospheric pollution between continents attracts increasing political attention. Greater international cooperation, also focusing on links between climate and air pollution policies, is required more than ever to address air pollution.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Thematic assessments
SOER Message Adapting to climate change — key message 2
A temperature rise of 2 °C or more above pre-industrial levels is likely to cause major societal, economic and environmental disruption, making it challenging for human and natural systems to adapt at affordable costs. Climate change will affect the vulnerability of European society to an array of threats to human health, almost all economic sectors, ecosystem goods and services and biodiversity.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Adapting to climate change - SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
SOER Message Biodiversity — key message 1
Biodiversity and the ecosystem services upon which we all depend are inextricably linked. Both are under pressure from humanity's ever-increasing use of natural resources. Europe's high resource consumption results in an ecological footprint that impacts biodiversity and ecosystem services on the continent and elsewhere in the world.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Biodiversity — SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
SOER Message Marine and coastal environment — key message 1
Degradation of marine and coastal ecosystems is observed in the Black, Mediterranean, Baltic, North East Atlantic Seas and in the Arctic. This trend is caused by fishing, agriculture, the industrial use of chemicals, tourist development, shipping, energy exploitation and other maritime activities. Projected climate change is likely to increase the impact of these activities in all seas, and in the Arctic
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Marine and coastal environment — SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
SOER Message Freshwater quality — key message 1
Europe’s freshwaters contain a number of pollutants including nutrients, metals, pesticides, pathogenic micro-organisms, industrial chemicals and pharmaceuticals. These can have adverse effects on aquatic ecosystems, degrading habitats and resulting in the loss of freshwater flora and fauna. Poor water quality can also raise concern for human health.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Freshwater quality — SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
SOER Message Urban environment — key message 5
Cities can be considered as 'ecosystems', albeit with a high technical component. Their urban metabolism is an open and dynamic system, which consumes, transforms and releases materials and energy, develops and adapts to changes, and interacts with humans and other ecosystems. Therefore they should be analysed and managed as other ecosystems.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Urban environment - SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
Figure Indicators of land cover change in Europe derived from land cover accounts, 24 countries, 1990-2000
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Mean annual artificial surface land-take by country, 1990-2000
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Publication Europe's ecological backbone: recognising the true value of our mountains
Europe's mountain areas have social, economic and environmental capital of significance for the entire continent. This importance has been recognised since the late 19th century through national legislation; since the 1970s through regional structures for cooperation; and since the 1990s through regional legal instruments for the Alps and Carpathians. The European Union (EU) first recognised the specific characteristics of mountain areas in 1975 through the designation of Less Favoured Areas (LFAs). During the last decade, EU cohesion policy and the Treaty of Lisbon have both focused specifically on mountains.
Located in Publications
Figure Coverage of the land cover accounts 1990-2000
Countries with available LEAC data
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
European Environment Agency (EEA)
Kongens Nytorv 6
1050 Copenhagen K
Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100