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You are here: Home / Publications / Environmental indicator report 2012 / Environmental indicator report 2012 - Ecosystem resilience and resource efficiency in a green economy in Europe
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Publication application/x-troff-ms 10 messages for 2010 - Coastal ecosystems
Key messages: 1) As an interface between land and sea, European coastlines provide vital resources for wildlife, but also for the economy and human health and well-being. 2) Multiple pressures, including habitat loss and degradation, pollution, climate change and overexploitation of fish stocks, affect coastal ecosystems. 3) Coastal habitat types and species of Community interest are at risk in Europe; two thirds of coastal habitat types and more than half of coastal species have an unfavourable conservation status. 4) Integrated and ecosystem-based approaches provide the foundation for sustainable coastal management and development, supporting socio-economic development, biodiversity and ecosystem services. Coordinated action at the global, regional and local levels will be key to sustainable management of coastal ecosystems.
Located in Publications
Publication 10 messages for 2010 — protected areas
Protected areas provide a wide range of services in a context of increasing pressures and a rapidly changing environment. Europe is the region with the greatest number of protected areas in the world but they are relatively small in size. Europe's Natura 2000, unique in the world and still young, and the Emerald network under development, are international European networks of protected areas that catalyse biodiversity conservation.
Located in Publications
Figure Agricultural land in proposed sites of Community Interest (pSCIs) under the habitats directive, as a proportion of the total areas designated as pSCI sites
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Availability of suitable white-backed woodpecker habitat in Finland for the time period when the population showed a rapid decline in numbers. Proper habitat destroyed is relative to the initial period 1956/1960
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
SOER Message Biodiversity — key message 2
Many habitats such as semi-natural grasslands, marshlands and bogs, and coastal wetlands are still declining and a significant number of species on land and in the European seas is threatened with extinction. Most biogeographic assessments of EU protected species and habitat types show an unfavourable conservation status.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Biodiversity — SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
Publication Biodiversity — SOER 2010 thematic assessment
Biodiversity — the variety of ecosystems, species and genes — is essential to human wellbeing, delivering services that sustain our economies and societies. Its huge importance makes biodiversity loss all the more troubling. European species are threatened with extinction and overexploitation. Natural habitats continue to be lost and fragmented, and degraded by pollution and climate change. Despite actions taken and progress made, these threats continue to impact biodiversity in Europe. The new global and EU targets to halt and reverse biodiversity loss by 2020 are ambitious but achieving them will require better policy implementation, coordination across sectors, ecosystem management approaches and a wider understanding of biodiversity's value.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Thematic assessments
Daviz Visualization Conservation status by main type of habitats
Located in Data and maps Data visualisations
Figure text/texmacs Conservation status by main type of habitats
How to read the graph: 10 % of coastal habitats have a favourable status and more than 30 % have an unfavourable-bad status
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Conservation status of assessed habitats in EU-25, by biogeographical region
How to read the map: in the Mediterranean biogeographical region (see Box 2.2 for an explanation of biogeograhical regions) about 21 % of habitats have a favourable conservation status but 37 % have an unfavourable (bad/inadequate) status.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Troff document Conservation status of coastal habitat types of European Union interest in the EU-25
Conservation status of habitats per biogeographical area in coastal ecosystems
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
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