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Figure Population-weighted concentrations of PM10 and O3 in urban agglomerations of more than 250 000 inhabitants in EU-27
Urban air quality is of major concern. The high density of population and of economic activities in urban areas results in increased emissions, ambient concentrations and exposure. The Structural Indicator for urban air quality is presented which comprises two sub-elements describing the annual variations in population weighted health-relevant concentrations of (1) ozone and (2) particulate matter (PM10) in ambient air in urban areas.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Publication Impact of selected policy measures on Europe's air quality
The main objective of the present study is to analyse and quantify the effects that certain past policy measures in the road transport and industrial combustion facilities have had on the magnitude of air pollutant emissions and subsequent air quality in Europe. The policies selected are the Euro emission standards for road vehicles and the EU directives on Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control (IPPC) and large combustion plants (LCP).
Located in Publications
Highlight Has policy improved Europe's air quality?
In recent decades, the EU has introduced a range of policies to improve air quality by controlling pollutant emissions. A new report by the European Environment Agency (EEA) evaluates three key instruments and finds that they have significantly improved Europe's air quality and reduced pollution-induced health effects. There is scope for even more progress, however, if countries achieve all their binding commitments to reduce emissions.
Located in News
SOER Message (Deprecated) Urban environment — key message 4
Despite some improvements, European cities and their inhabitants will still face a number of important challenges in the future. They are highly vulnerable to many impacts of climate change such as heat waves, water scarcity, flooding, and related health problems, and will still need to cope with high transport loads, air quality problems, noise and loss of green areas.
Located in The European environment — state and outlook 2015 Urban environment - SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
SOER Message (Deprecated) Urban environment — key message 1
For the three-quarters of Europe's population that lives in cities and towns, a good urban environment is a precondition for a good quality of life. This quality of life depends inter alia on clean air and water, efficient transport, low noise levels and green spaces.
Located in The European environment — state and outlook 2015 Urban environment - SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
Publication chemical/x-pdb Urban environment - SOER 2010 thematic assessment
The global population is congregating in our cities. Eighty per cent of the world’s estimated nine billion people in 2050 are expected to live in urban areas. Our cities and urban areas face many challenges from social to health to environmental. The impacts of cities and urban areas are felt in other regions which supply cities with food, water and energy and absorb pollution and waste. However, the proximity of people, businesses and services associated with the very word ‘city’ means that there are also huge opportunities. Indeed, well designed, well managed urban settings offer a key opportunity for sustainable living.
Located in The European environment — state and outlook 2015 Thematic assessments
SOER Message (Deprecated) Air pollution — key message 5
As European emissions decrease, there is increasing recognition of the importance of inter-continental transport of air pollutants and its contribution to poor air quality in Europe. This contribution is particularly large for ozone, persistent organic pollutants, and mercury, and for particulate matter during air pollution episodes. Further international cooperation to mitigate inter-continental flows of air pollution will help nations meet their own goals and objectives for protecting public health and environmental quality.
Located in The European environment — state and outlook 2015 Air pollution — SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
Indicator Assessment chemical/x-pdb Emissions of ozone precursors (CSI 002/APE 008) - Assessment published Oct 2010
Emissions of all ground-level ozone precursor pollutants have decreased across the EEA-32 region between 1990 and 2008; nitrogen oxides (NO X ) by 34%, non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) by 45%, carbon monoxide (CO) by 56% and methane (CH 4 ) by 26%. This decrease has been achieved mainly as a result of the introduction of catalytic converters for vehicles. These changes have significantly reduced emissions of NO X and CO from the road transport sector, the main source of ozone precursor emissions. The EU-27 is still some way from meeting its 2010 target to reduce emissions of NO X , one of the two ozone precursors (NO X and NMVOC) for which emission limits exist under the EU's NEC Directive (NECD). Whilst total NMVOC emissions in the EU-27 were below the NECD limit in 2008, a number of individual Member States anticipate missing their ceilings for one or either of these two pollutants. Of the three non-EU countries having emission ceilings set under the UNECE/CLRTAP Gothenburg protocol (Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland), all three countries reported NMVOC emissions in 2008 that were lower than their respective 2010 ceilings. However both Liechtenstein and Norway reported NO x emissions in 2008 that were substantially higher than their respective 2010 ceilings.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Emissions of ozone precursors
Indicator Assessment chemical/x-pdb Emissions of acidifying substances (CSI 001/APE 007) - Assessment published Oct 2010
Emissions of acidifying pollutants (nitrogen oxides (NO X ), sulphur oxides (SO 2 ) and ammonia (NH 3 ) have decreased significantly in most of the individual EEA member countries between 1990 and 2008. Emissions of SO 2 have decreased by 74 %, NO X by 34 % and NH 3 emissions by 24 % since 1990. The EU-27 is on track to meet its overall target to reduce emissions of SO 2 and NH 3 as specified by the EU's NEC Directive (NECD). However a large number of individual Member States, and the EU as a whole, anticipate missing the 2010 emission ceilings set for NO X in the NECD, Of the three non-EU countries having emission ceilings set under the UNECE/CLRTAP Gothenburg protocol (Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland), both Liechtenstein and Norway also reported NO X emissions in 2008 that were substantially higher than their respective 2010 ceilings.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Emissions of acidifying substances
Figure Emission trends of acidifying pollutants (EEA member countries, EU-27)
This chart shows past emission trends of nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulphur oxides (SOx) and ammonia (NH3) in the EEA-32 and EU-27 group of countries. In addition - for the EU-27 - the aggregated Member State 2010 emission ceilings for the respective pollutants are shown
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
European Environment Agency (EEA)
Kongens Nytorv 6
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Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100