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Publication EEA Signals 2009 - Key environmental issues facing Europe
Signals is published by the European Environment Agency (EEA) at the start of each year and provides snapshot stories on issues of interest both to the environmental policy debate and the wider public for the upcoming year. The eight stories addressed are not exhaustive but have been selected on the basis of their relevance to the current environmental policy debate in Europe. They address priority issues of climate change, nature and biodiversity, the use of natural resources and health.
Located in Publications
File Effects of climate change
In the past 100 years, the number of cold and frost days has decreased in most parts of Europe, whereas the number of days with temperatures above 25°C and the number of heatwaves have increased. The frequency of very wet days has significantly decreased in recent decades in many places in southern Europe, but increased in mid and northern Europe. Cold winters are projected to disappear almost entirely by 2080 and hot summers are projected to become much more frequent. This will have a continuing effect on mountain regions. For every 1°C increase in temperature, the snowline rises by 150 metres. And by 2050, three-quarters of today's glaciers in parts of the Alps are expected to have disappeared. Source: State of the Environment Report No 1/2005 "The European environment - State and outlook 2005" (published 29 Nov 2005)
Located in Environmental topics Climate change Multimedia
Publication EMEP/CORINAIR Emission Inventory Guidebook - 2007
Located in Publications
File Emissions trading
(This video has audio) An explanation of emissions trading. Source: EU Emissions Trading - An Open Scheme Promoting Global Innovation to Combat Climate Change (Nov. 2004), by the EU Publications Office
Located in Environmental topics Climate change Multimedia
File Emissions trading - putting a price on carbon
The EU Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) is a world first and a major weapon in Europe's fight against climate change. The innovative system has turned carbon dioxide emissions into a tradeable commodity. They can now be bought and sold like any other of the thousands of products traded on world markets today. The scheme works by placing a limit or a 'cap' on the amount of carbon dioxide participating installations - currently around 10,500 across the European Union - can emit every year. If an installation emits more than its allowance, it must either pay a very hefty fine or buy surplus allowances from companies that have managed to stay below their limit. The system ensures that overall CO2 emissions from the plants covered are cut in the most cost effective way.
Located in Environmental topics Climate change Multimedia
Publication End-user GHG emissions from energy
Reallocation of emissions from energy industries to end users 2005–2009
Located in Publications
File Energy and environment: democratisation of power
European Parliament - Joint Parliamentary Meeting on "Energy and Sustainable Development", presentation by Prof. Jacqueline McGlade, Executive Director, European Environment Agency. Strasbourg, November 20 2008.
Located in Environmental topics Energy Multimedia
Figure C source code header Estimated global warming at which the onset of the events could occur versus their impact
Temperature increase (above 1990 level) at which the various events could occur and an estimate of their impact. The impact scale has subjective qualifications (‘minor’, ‘notable’, ‘major’ and ‘devastating’), which were assigned on the basis of the geographical scale (from ‘regional’ to ‘continental’ and ‘global’) and the character of the damages (‘light’, ‘moderate’, ‘heavy’ or ‘extreme’). The level of scientific understanding, as well as the understanding of possible impacts for most of these events is low. The shapes and sizes of the ovals do not represent uncertainties in impact and temperature onset of eventualities and these uncertainties may be significant.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
File Europe leads the fight against climate change
The Earth is rapidly getting warmer, threatening serious and even catastrophic disruption to our societies and to the natural environment on which we depend. Over the course of the 20th century the average temperature increased by around 0.6 C globally, by almost 1 C in Europe and by no less than 5 C in the Arctic. This man-made warming is already having many disruptive effects around the globe. Sea levels are rising as a result of melting glaciers and ice sheets, threatening to flood low-lying communities. Extreme weather conditions; floods, droughts, storms are becoming more severe, more frequent and more costly in some parts of the world. And many endangered species may be pushed to extinction over the coming decades as climate change affects their traditional habitats.
Located in Environmental topics Climate change Multimedia
Highlight Europe using less ozone-damaging chemicals
Europe has made significant progress in phasing out chemicals which damage the ozone layer, according to a report from the European Environment Agency (EEA). The report considers production and use of more than 200 chemicals which damage the planet’s ozone layer, which are controlled by the Montreal Protocol and EU legislation.
Located in News
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