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File Environment, health and quality of life — SOER synthesis chapter 5
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Synthesis The European environment – state and outlook 2010: Synthesis
Highlight Europe’s environment now healthier – but new risks emerging
Europeans live longer and healthier lives than in the past, partly due to successful environmental policies that have reduced the exposure to harmful environmental contaminants in air, water and food, according to a new report. However, these contaminants are still a problem, and several new health risks are emerging, for example, from new chemicals, new products and changing lifestyle patterns.
Located in News
Publication Feasibility assessment of using the Substance Flow Analysis Methodology for chemicals information at macro-level
Located in Publications
Publication Feasibility study: Modelling environmental concentrations of chemicals from emission data
Located in Publications
File Getting Europe's precious waters clean again
Protecting water from pollution is one of the biggest environmental challenges that we face. In recent decades, major disasters like the Sandoz incident in 1986 demonstrated that pollution knows no frontiers and that strong EU actions and cooperation were needed. This detailed news report looks at the ways in which Europe’s determination to protect water in all its forms is achieving results. From the European quality of the drinking water, through the treatment of waste water, to protection of its rivers, coasts and lakes – over the last few decades it has developed an effective legislative arsenal. The aim of the European Union is for all the water on its territory to by in good status by 2015. Although challenges remain, results are obvious. For example, in 2000, the EU adopted a directive promoting trans-boundary co-operation and introducing the river basin management concept where the territory of the river as a whole is taken into account. And in terms of bathing water, since 1990, the number of bathing sites fulfilling the EU standards has increased by almost 30% to an impressive 90%.
Located in Environmental topics Water Multimedia
Highlight text/x-sh Hazardous substances in Europe’s fresh and marine waters – an overview
Hazardous substances in fresh and marine water can harm aquatic life and pose a risk to human health, according to a new report published today by the European Environment Agency (EEA). The report notes that while European legislation to address the issue is relatively strong, new challenges exist including ‘emerging pollutants’ where potential effects are not yet fully understood. More effort is also needed to ensure that chemicals are produced and used more sustainably.
Located in News
Publication text/x-sh Hazardous substances in Europe's fresh and marine waters — An overview
Chemicals are an essential part of our daily lives and are used to produce consumer goods, to protect or restore our health and to boost food production, to name but a few examples. Some chemicals, however, are hazardous, raising concerns for the environment and human health. Hazardous substances are emitted to fresh and marine waters via a number of pathways and can have detrimental effects on aquatic biota. Humans can be exposed to hazardous substances in water through the ingestion of contaminated drinking water and the consumption of contaminated freshwater fish and seafood. A wide range of legislation now exists in Europe to address the release of hazardous substances to the environment, including water. New challenges exist, however, including the issues of chemical mixtures and emerging pollutants.
Located in Publications
Press Release Increase in cancers and fertility problems may be caused by household chemicals and pharmaceuticals
Chemicals which disrupt the hormone system – also known as 'endocrine disrupting chemicals' (EDCs) – may be a contributing factor behind the significant increases in cancers, diabetes and obesity, falling fertility, and an increased number of neurological development problems in both humans and animals, according to a review of recent scientific literature commissioned by the European Environment Agency (EEA).
Located in Media News
File Late lessons II Chapter 4 - Too much to swallow PCE contamination of mains water
Located in Publications Late lessons from early warnings: science, precaution, innovation Single chapters
File Late lessons II Chapter 5 - Minamata disease a challenge for democracy and justice
Located in Publications Late lessons from early warnings: science, precaution, innovation Single chapters
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