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Indicator Assessment chemical/x-pdb Land take (CSI 014/LSI 001) - Assessment published Feb 2011
Land take by the expansion of residential areas and construction sites is the main cause of the increase in the coverage of urban land at the European level. Agricultural zones and, to a lesser extent, forests and semi-natural and natural areas, are disappearing in favour of the development of artificial surfaces. This affects biodiversity since it decreases habitats, the living space of a number of species, and fragments the landscapes that support and connect them. The annual land take in 36 European countries was 111 788 ha/year in 2000-2006. In 21 countries covered by both periods (1990-2000 and 2000-2006) the annual land take increased by 9 % in the later period. The composition of land taken areas changed, too. More arable land and permanent crops, forests, grasslands and open spaces and less pastures and mosaic farmland were taken by artificial development then in 1990-2000. 
Located in Data and maps Indicators Land take
Highlight UNEP report maps the pathways to a green economy
The EEA welcomes the publication today of UNEP's report 'Pathways to a green economy'. It represents a valuable contribution to the current debate on moving the world to a sustainable path in the 21st century.
Located in News
Article Renewable energy 2000 to 2010 — from toddler to teen
The renewable energy sector has developed a lot the last ten years — a largely ignored toddler has become a wilful teenager. Decisions that can help it mature further will depend on understanding what has nurtured its growth so far.
Located in Articles
Article chemical/x-pdb Cutting deficits and protecting the environment
Europeans consume more natural resources than Europe’s environment can produce. Our consumption undermines the capacity of European ecosystems to provide goods and services and puts severe strain on the global environment.
Located in Articles
Article Octet Stream Tackling climate change requires a shift to a resource efficient, low carbon and green economy
Climate change is happening. The current global average temperature is already about 0.7-0.8 degree Celsius above the pre-industrial level. Even if greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations had stabilized in the year 2000, temperatures are predicted to increase by 1.2 degrees Celsius above the pre-industrial level by the end of the 21st century.
Located in Articles
Press Release Butterflies or business - Europe can have both!
The European Environment Agency (EEA) released today its fourth Environment State and Outlook report — SOER 2010 — a comprehensive assessment of how and why Europe’s environment is changing, and what we are doing about it. SOER 2010 concludes that a fully integrated approach to transforming Europe to a resource-efficient green economy can not only result in a healthy environment, but also boost prosperity and social cohesion.
Located in Media News
Publication application/vnd.symbian.install The European environment – state and outlook 2010: Synthesis
The SOER 2010 Synthesis provides an overview of the European environment's state, trends and prospects, integrating the main findings of SOER 2010.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Synthesis
Publication Material resources and waste — SOER 2010 thematic assessment
The European economy needs huge amounts of resources to function. Apart from consuming minerals, metals, concrete and wood, Europe burns fossil fuels and uses land to satisfy the needs of its citizens. Demand for materials is so intense that between 20 and 30 % of the resources we use are now imported. At the other end of the materials chain, the EU economy generates around six tons of waste per person every year. With the boom in international trade, EU consumption and production may potentially damage ecosystems and human health not only within but also far beyond its borders.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Thematic assessments
File Carbon farmers: Environmental Atlas of Europe — Italy
The family run Fattoria La Vialla in Tuscany is a shining example of truly sustainable farm-ing. Every element of the production chain, from preparing the soil through to packaging the produce, has been planned with the environment in mind.
Located in The Environmental Atlas Carbon farmers Video
File Power to the people: Environmental Atlas of Europe — Denmark
Thisted in north west Jutland is the most climate-friendly municipality in Denmark. Since the early 1980s, they've been using a creative mix of sustainable energy sources to provide heating and power for their 46,000 residents. In recognition of their contribution to renewable energy they were awarded the European Solar Prize in 2007.
Located in The Environmental Atlas Power to the people Video
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