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Figure Change in the distribution of Aedes albopictus in Europe
Areas marked as ‘2011’ indicate that the tiger mosquito was detected in 2011 for the first time. They include areas of known geographical expansion of A. albopictus in France, northern Italy and Spain where vector surveillance has been in place since 2008 but also areas in Albania, Greece, and central and southern Italy, where the first detection of the vector in 2011 could be the result of increased vector surveillance rather than actual geographical expansion. ‘2008–2010’ refers to all areas where the vector has been present before 2011. Indoor presence corresponds to the presence recorded in greenhouses.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Climatic suitability for the mosquitos Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus in Europe
This figure shows the climatic suitability for the mosquitos Aedes aegypti (left) and Aedes albopictus (right) in Europe. Darker to lighter green indicates conditions not suitable for the vector whereas yellow to red colours indicate conditions that are increasingly suitable for the vector. Grey indicates that no prediction is possible.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure European distribution of Borrelia burgdorferi in questing I. ricinus ticks
The risks described in this figure are relative to each other according to a standard distribution scale. Risk is defined as the probability of finding nymphal ticks positive for Borrelia burgdorferi. For each prevalence quartile, associated climate traits were used to produce a qualitative evaluation of risk according to Office International des Epizooties (OIE) standards at five levels (high, moderate, low, negligible, and null), which directly correlate with the probability of finding nymphal ticks with prevalence in the four quartiles.
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Figure D source code Number of people affected by flooding per million population in the WHO European Region
Number of people affected by flooding per million population in the WHO European Region (total over the period 2000–2011). ‘People affected’, as defined in EM-DAT, are people who require immediate assistance during a period of emergency, including displaced or evacuated people. EM-DAT/CRED and the Dartmouth Flood Observatory were analysed to determine the flooded countries in the WHO European Region and the impact of these floods.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Lead 2010 - Annual limit value for the protection of human health
In the air quality directive (2008/EC/50), the EU has set a limit value for lead (Pb) for the protection of human health: the Pb annual mean value may not exceed 0.5 milligrams per cubic metre (µg/m3) except in the immediate vicinity of specific, notified industrial sources where the Pb annual mean value may not exceed 1.0 milligram per cubic metre (µg/m3)
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Particulate matter (PM10), 2010 - Daily limit value for the protection of human health
In the air quality directive (2008/EC/50), the EU has set two limit values for particulate matter (PM10) for the protection of human health: the PM10 daily mean value may not exceed 50 micrograms per cubic metre (µg/m3) more than 35 times in a year and the PM10 annual mean value may not exceed 40 micrograms per cubic metre (µg/m3). In some areas time extensions have been granted by DG Environment for meeting these limit values. Information about time extensions is provided by DG Environment at: http://ec.europa.eu/environment/air/quality/legislation/time_extensions.htm
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Ozone 2010 - 8 hour mean target value for the protection of human health
In the air quality directive (2008/EC/50), the EU has set a target value and a long term objective value for ozone (O3) for the protection of human health. Target value: the maximum daily eight-hour mean may not exceed 120 micrograms per cubic metre (µg/m3) on more than 25 days per calendar year averaged over three years. Long term objective value: the maximum daily eight-hour mean may not exceed 120 micrograms per cubic metre (µg/m3) within a calendar year.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure PM2.5 2010 - Annual target value for the protection of human health
In the air quality directive (2008/EC/50), the EU has set a target value for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) for the protection of human health: the PM2.5 annual mean value may not exceed 25 micrograms per cubic metre (µg/m3).
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Particulate matter (PM10) 2010 - Annual limit value for the protection of human health
In the air quality directive (2008/EC/50), the EU has set two limit values for particulate matter (PM10) for the protection of human health: the PM10 daily mean value may not exceed 50 micrograms per cubic metre (µg/m3) more than 35 times in a year and the PM10 annual mean value may not exceed 40 micrograms per cubic metre (µg/m3). In some areas time extensions have been granted by DG Environment for meeting these limit values. Information about time extensions is provided by DG Environment at: http://ec.europa.eu/environment/air/quality/legislation/time_extensions.htm
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Publication Air quality in Europe — 2012 report
This report presents an overview and analysis of the status and trends of air quality in Europe based on concentration measurements in ambient air and data on anthropogenic emissions and trends from 2001 — when mandatory monitoring of ambient air concentrations of selected pollutants first produced reliable air quality information — to 2010.
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European Environment Agency (EEA)
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