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Indicator Assessment chemical/x-pdb Ocean acidification (CLIM 043) - Assessment published Nov 2012
Surface-ocean pH has declined from 8.2 to 8.1 over the industrial era due to the growth of atmospheric CO 2 concentrations. This decline corresponds to a 30 % change in oceanic acidity. Observed reductions in surface-water pH are nearly identical across the global ocean and throughout Europe’s seas. Ocean acidification in recent decades is occurring a hundred times faster than during past natural events over the last 55 million years. Ocean acidification already reaches into the deep ocean, particularly in the high latitudes. Average surface-water pH is projected to decline further to 7.7 or 7.8 by the year 2100, depending on future CO 2 emissions. This decline represents a 100 to 150 % increase in acidity. Ocean acidification may affect many marine organisms within the next 20 years and could alter marine ecosystems and fisheries.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Ocean acidification
Figure Troff document Decline in pH measured at the Aloha station as part of the Hawaii Ocean time-series
Aloha station pH time series. Changes here are similar to those that are observed at a much shorter time scale in Europe.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Article Marine — biodiversity under pressure
Located in Signals — every breath we take Signals 2010
File Troff document Climate change — time to act
Climate change is a real and current threat. To avoid major irreversible impacts on society and ecosystems, we must act now.
Located in Media Audiovisuals
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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