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Figure Relative gaps between EU Kyoto and burden sharing targets and projections for 2010 including existing and additional measures, use of Kyoto mechanisms (KM) and use of carbon sinks for EU Member States
This graph shows the projected effects of policies, measures, use of Kyoto mechanisms and carbon sinks by EU Member States on GHG emissions by 2010
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Remaining gap (over-delivery or shortfall) in absolute terms including the effects of additional policies and measures, Kyoto mechanisms and carbon sinks
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Remaining gap projected for 2010 by the new Member States in absolute terms, including the effects of additional policies and measures as well as carbon sinks
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Indicator Assessment Renewable gross final energy consumption (ENER 028) - Assessment published Apr 2012
In 2009, the share of renewable energy in final gross energy consumption (with normalised hydro and wind) [1] in the EU-27 was 11.7 % up from 6% in 1990, representing nearly 60 % of the 20 % target set in the EU directive on renewable energy for 2020. Renewable energies represented in 2009, 13.1% of total final heat consumption (6.6% in 1990), 19.6% of electricity consumption (up from 11.8% in 1990) and 4.1% of transport fuels consumption (up from 0.02% in 1993) [2] . [1] Gross final consumption of energy is defined in Directive 2009/28/EC on renewable sources as energy commodities delivered for energy purposes to final consumers (industry, transport, households, services, agriculture, forestry and fisheries), including the consumption of electricity and heat by the energy branch for electricity and heat production and including losses of electricity and heat in distribution and transmission. [2] The gross final consumption of energy from renewable sources is calculated as the sum of: (a) gross final consumption of electricity from renewable energy sources; (b) gross final consumption of energy from renewable sources for heating and cooling; and (c) final consumption of energy from renewable sources in transport.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Renewable gross final energy consumption
Indicator Assessment Renewable gross final energy consumption (ENER 028) - Assessment published Aug 2011
In 2008, the share of renewable energy in final gross energy consumption (with normalised hydro and wind) [1] in the EU-27 was 10.4 % (up from 6% in 1990, 7.6 % in 2000), representing half of the 20 % target set in the EU directive on renewable energy for 2020. Renewable energies represented in 2008, 11.8% of total final heat consumption (up from 6.3% in 1990, 9% in 2000), 17% of electricity consumption (up from 12% in 1990, 13.8% in 2000) and 3.4% of transport fuels consumption (up from 0.02% in 1993) [2] [1] Gross final consumption of energy is defined in Directive 2009/28/EC on renewable sources as energy commodities delivered for energy purposes to final consumers (industry, transport, households, services, agriculture, forestry and fisheries), including the consumption of electricity and heat by the energy branch for electricity and heat production and including losses of electricity and heat in distribution and transmission. [2] The gross final consumption of energy from renewable sources is calculated as the sum of: (a) gross final consumption of electricity from renewable energy sources; (b) gross final consumption of energy from renewable sources for heating and cooling; and (c) final consumption of energy from renewable sources in transport.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Renewable gross final energy consumption
Indicator Assessment Renewable gross final energy consumption (ENER 028) - Assessment published Jan 2011
In 2007, the share of renewable energy in final energy consumption (with normalised hydro) in the EU-27 was 10.0 % (up from 6.7 % in 1993), representing half of the 20 % target set in the new EU directive on renewable energy for 2020. Renewable energies represented in 2007, 11.6% of total final heat consumption (up from 7.6% in 1993), 16.3% of electricity consumption (up from 12.8% in 1993) and 2.6% of transport fuels consumption. In the EEA countries, the share of renewable energy in total gross final energy consumption was 11.3% in 2007.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Renewable gross final energy consumption
File Repairing our ozone layer
In 1987, delegates from around the world signed the Montreal Protocol designed to protect the ozone layer by phasing out the production of a number of substances believed to be responsible for ozone depletion. This recent video illustrates the results of the Protocol, which is considered to be one of the most successful international environmental agreements.
Located in Environmental topics Air pollution Multimedia
File PostScript document Rising snowline in the Alps
(This video has no audio.) It is estimated that, as global warming proceeds, regions currently receiving snowfall will increasingly receive precipitation in the form of rain. For every 1ºC increase in temperature, the snowline rises by about 150 metres. As a result, less snow will accumulate at low elevations. As a consequence, nearly half of all ski resorts in Switzerland, and even more in Germany, Austria and the Pyrenees, will face difficulties in attracting tourists and winter sport enthusiasts in the future. Source: EEA Report No 2/2004 "Impacts of Europe's changing climate" (published 18 Aug 2004)
Located in Environmental topics Climate change Multimedia
Figure Riverine flood damage potential
This map presents riverine flood damage potential for a 100-year return period, current climate and no defences; catchments and sub-catchments of less than 500 km2 are not included
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure object code Run-off and snow cover change up until the end of the 21st century in the winter, according to the CLM A1B scenario
Left: relative difference in water available for runoff
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
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