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File Late lessons II Chapter 6 - Beryllium's 'public relations problem'
Located in Publications Late lessons from early warnings: science, precaution, innovation Single chapters
File Late lessons II Chapter 10 - Bisphenol A contested science divergent safety evaluations
Located in Publications Late lessons from early warnings: science, precaution, innovation Single chapters
Highlight Neonicotinoid pesticides are a huge risk – so ban is welcome, says EEA
The European Commission has decided to ban three neonicotinoid insecticides. These chemicals can harm honeybees, according to a large body of scientific evidence, so the European Environment Agency (EEA) commends the precautionary decision to ban them.
Located in News
Part A - Lessons from health hazards
Part A commences with an analysis of 'false positives' showing that these are few and far between as compared to false negatives and that carefully designed precautionary actions can stimulate innovation, even if the risk turns out not to be real or as serious as initially feared.
Located in Publications Late lessons from early warnings: science, precaution, innovation
File Troff document Pollution from antifouling paint
(Transcription of audio on video) Antifouling paint was developed to reduce drag on ship hulls by preventing the buildup of barnacles and other organisms, consequently making ships faster and more fuel efficient. However its propensity for wider impacts on the marine environment had been grossly underestimated. The chemicals used prevented molluscs like oysters from reproducing, and in the 1970's and 80's widespread collapse of mollusc stocks in and around harbours was reported. These types of paints have now been banned on small vessels, and complete phase out from global shipping fleets is planned by 2008. Source: SOER 2005
Located in Environmental topics Biodiversity Multimedia
Figure Production of chemicals
The bar graphic compares current (2005) and projected (2015 and 2030) chemicals production for 3 world regions in USD. The map precise the regions considered: OECD countries (darker blue), BRIICS countries (red), and rest of the world (pale blue).
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
File REACH: A new regulation for chemical substances
The new European law known as REACH (Registration, Evaluation and Authorisation of Chemicals) was adopted by the Member States and the European Parliament and has entered into force in June 2007. By tabling this new legislation, the European Commission demonstrated its determination to protect Europeans' health and the environment. Indeed, recent scientific research has demonstrated that certain chemicals enter and accumulate in living organisms, including humans. While all substances placed on the market after 1981 have been tested to assess their safety, that is not the case for the tens of thousands of chemicals marketed before that date. That is why the European Union has developed this ambitious new Regulation on chemicals, one of the key sectors of the European economy.
Located in Environmental topics Chemicals Multimedia
File Sources of water pollution
(Transcription of audio on video) Water can be polluted from many sources. Faecal contamination from sewage makes water unpleasant and unsafe for recreational activities such as swimming, boating or fishing. Many organic pollutants, including sewage effluent and farm and food-processing wastes consume oxygen, suffocating fish and other aquatic life. Nutrients such as nitrates and phosphates, from everything from farm fertilisers to household detergents, can 'overfertilise' the water causing the growth of large mats of algae, some of which are directly toxic. When the algae die, they sink to the water bottom, decomposing, consuming oxygen and damaging ecosystems. Chemical contaminants including heavy metals, pesticides and some industrial chemicals can threaten wildlife and human health. Sediment run-off from the land can make water muddy, blocking sunlight and, as a result, killing wildlife. And irrigation, especially when used improperly, can bring flows of salts, nutrients and other pollutants from soils into water. Source: SOER 2005
Located in Environmental topics Biodiversity Multimedia
Press Release The cost of ignoring the warning signs - EEA publishes ‘Late Lessons from Early Warnings, volume II’
New technologies have sometimes had very harmful effects, but in many cases the early warning signs have been suppressed or ignored. The second volume of Late Lessons from Early Warnings investigates specific cases where danger signals have gone unheeded, in some cases leading to deaths, illness and environmental destruction.
Located in Media News
Publication The impacts of endocrine disrupters on wildlife, people and their environments – The Weybridge+15 (1996–2011) report
Rates of endocrine diseases and disorders, such as some reproductive and developmental harm in human populations, have changed in line with the growth of the chemical industry, leading to concerns that these factors may be linked. For example, the current status of semen quality in the few European countries where studies have been systematically conducted, is very poor: fertility in approximately 40 % of men is impaired. There is also evidence of reproductive and developmental harm linked to impairments in endocrine function in a number of wildlife species, particularly in environments that are contaminated by cocktails of chemicals that are in everyday use. Based on the human and wildlife evidence, many scientists are concerned about chemical pollutants being able to interfere with the normal functioning of hormones, so-called endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), that could play a causative role in these diseases and disorders. If this holds true, then these 'early warnings' signal a failure in environmental protection that should be addressed.
Located in Publications
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