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Daviz Visualization Emissions of primary PM10 and PM2.5 particulate matter
Located in Data and maps Data visualisation
Figure AirBase - Exchange of information
Observed concentration maps for which 2012 air quality data for components O3, PM10, NO2, SO2, C6H6, PM2.5, CO, BaP, Pb, Cd, As and Ni have been reported.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Daviz Visualization Sector share for emissions of primary PM2.5 and PM10 particulate matter
Located in Data and maps Data visualisation
Daviz Visualization Percentage change in PM2.5 and PM10 emissions
Located in Data and maps Data visualisation
Figure Particulate matter (PM10) - Annual limit value for the protection of human health
In the air quality directive (2008/EC/50), the EU has set two limit values for particulate matter (PM10) for the protection of human health: the PM10 daily mean value may not exceed 50 micrograms per cubic metre (µg/m3) more than 35 times in a year and the PM10 annual mean value may not exceed 40 micrograms per cubic metre (µg/m3). In some areas time extensions have been granted by DG Environment for meeting these limit values. Information about time extensions is provided by DG Environment at: http://ec.europa.eu/environment/air/quality/legislation/time_extensions.htm
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Press Release RealAudio broadcast Air pollution still harming health across Europe
Around 90 % of city dwellers in the European Union (EU) are exposed to one of the most damaging air pollutants at levels deemed harmful to health by the World Health Organisation (WHO). This result comes from the latest assessment of air quality in Europe, published by the European Environment Agency (EEA).
Located in Media News
Article Every breath we take
We breathe from the moment we are born until the moment we die. It is a vital and constant need, not only for us but for all life on Earth. Poor air quality affects us all: it harms our health and the health of the environment, which leads to economic losses. But what does the air we breathe consist of and where do the various air pollutants come from?
Located in Signals — Living in a changing climate Signals 2013 Articles
Publication Air pollution — SOER 2010 thematic assessment
Emissions of air pollutants derive from almost all economic and societal activities. They result in clear risks to human health and ecosystems. In Europe, policies and actions at all levels have greatly reduced anthropogenic emissions and exposure but some air pollutants still harm human health. Similarly, as emissions of acidifying pollutants have reduced, the situation for Europe's rivers and lakes has improved but atmospheric nitrogen oversupply still threatens biodiversity in sensitive terrestrial and water ecosystems. The movement of atmospheric pollution between continents attracts increasing political attention. Greater international cooperation, also focusing on links between climate and air pollution policies, is required more than ever to address air pollution.
Located in The European environment — state and outlook 2015 Thematic assessments
SOER Message (Deprecated) Air pollution — key message 1
Air pollution damages human health and the environment. Considerable progress has been made in Europe to reduce emissions and exposure to different air pollutants such as sulphur dioxide (SO2) and lead (Pb). However, despite reductions, certain air pollutants, especially particulate matter (PM), ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and some organic compounds, still pose a threat to human health. For the EEA-32 group of countries, it has been estimated that in 2005 almost 5 million lost life years could be attributed to air pollution with fine particles (PM2.5) alone.
Located in The European environment — state and outlook 2015 Air pollution — SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
SOER Message (Deprecated) Urban environment — key message 2
Despite substantial reductions in some urban air pollutants, data for the period 1997 to 2008 show that for any given year up to 40 to 60 % of urban citizens can be exposed to concentrations of either particulate matter or ozone above the EU limits. Environmental noise, mainly from transport, continues to affect large numbers of people. Urban wastewater collection and treatment improved markedly, but discharges of some harmful chemicals remain a concern.
Located in The European environment — state and outlook 2015 Urban environment - SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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