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File chemical/x-pdb 50 years of protecting Europe's environment
Today the European Union has the most environmentally friendly arsenal of rules in the world and has done more to tackle pressing ecological problems, such as climate change, than any other major power. But it has not always been like this. Caring for the environment did not feature in the Treaty of Rome, the document that gave birth to the modern day EU. Yet environmental problems were never far away. Europe’s love affair with the car was moving into top gear, industry was busy belching out pollutants and raw sewage was being pumped into our rivers and seas.
Located in Environmental topics Policy instruments Multimedia
File chemical/x-pdb Controlling chemicals - Protecting human health and the environment
Chemicals are a fact of modern life: almost all the products we use on a daily basis are either made from them or contain them. But without proper controls, they can be dangerous. Unsurprisingly, Europe’s lawmakers have always taken an extremely serious approach towards policies surrounding chemicals. As a result, EU citizens benefit from some of the toughest chemicals safety laws in the world.
Located in Environmental topics Chemicals Multimedia
File REACH: A new regulation for chemical substances
The new European law known as REACH (Registration, Evaluation and Authorisation of Chemicals) was adopted by the Member States and the European Parliament and has entered into force in June 2007. By tabling this new legislation, the European Commission demonstrated its determination to protect Europeans' health and the environment. Indeed, recent scientific research has demonstrated that certain chemicals enter and accumulate in living organisms, including humans. While all substances placed on the market after 1981 have been tested to assess their safety, that is not the case for the tens of thousands of chemicals marketed before that date. That is why the European Union has developed this ambitious new Regulation on chemicals, one of the key sectors of the European economy.
Located in Environmental topics Chemicals Multimedia
Publication Feasibility study: Modelling environmental concentrations of chemicals from emission data
Located in Publications
Publication Towards a European Chemicals Information System: a survey on reported monitoring activities of chemicals in Europe
Located in Publications
Publication Feasibility assessment of using the Substance Flow Analysis Methodology for chemicals information at macro-level
Located in Publications
Publication Annual European Community greenhouse gas inventory 1990-2004 and inventory report 2006
Located in Publications
Animation (swf) C source code header Environment and our health
Located in Environmental topics Environment and health Multimedia
File Troff document Pollution from antifouling paint
(Transcription of audio on video) Antifouling paint was developed to reduce drag on ship hulls by preventing the buildup of barnacles and other organisms, consequently making ships faster and more fuel efficient. However its propensity for wider impacts on the marine environment had been grossly underestimated. The chemicals used prevented molluscs like oysters from reproducing, and in the 1970's and 80's widespread collapse of mollusc stocks in and around harbours was reported. These types of paints have now been banned on small vessels, and complete phase out from global shipping fleets is planned by 2008. Source: SOER 2005
Located in Environmental topics Biodiversity Multimedia
File Sources of water pollution
(Transcription of audio on video) Water can be polluted from many sources. Faecal contamination from sewage makes water unpleasant and unsafe for recreational activities such as swimming, boating or fishing. Many organic pollutants, including sewage effluent and farm and food-processing wastes consume oxygen, suffocating fish and other aquatic life. Nutrients such as nitrates and phosphates, from everything from farm fertilisers to household detergents, can 'overfertilise' the water causing the growth of large mats of algae, some of which are directly toxic. When the algae die, they sink to the water bottom, decomposing, consuming oxygen and damaging ecosystems. Chemical contaminants including heavy metals, pesticides and some industrial chemicals can threaten wildlife and human health. Sediment run-off from the land can make water muddy, blocking sunlight and, as a result, killing wildlife. And irrigation, especially when used improperly, can bring flows of salts, nutrients and other pollutants from soils into water. Source: SOER 2005
Located in Environmental topics Biodiversity Multimedia
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