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Indicator Assessment Land take
Land take by the expansion of residential areas and construction sites is the main cause of the increase in the coverage of urban land at the European level. Agricultural zones and, to a lesser extent, forests and semi-natural and natural areas, are disappearing in favour of the development of artificial surfaces. This affects biodiversity since it decreases habitats, the living space of a number of species, and fragments the landscapes that support and connect them. The annual land take in European countries assessed by 2006 Corine land cover project (EEA39 except Greece) was approximately 108 000 ha/year in 2000-2006. In 21 countries covered by both periods (1990-2000 and 2000-2006) the annual land take decreased by 9 % in the later period. The composition of land taken areas changed, too. More arable land and permanent crops and less pastures and mosaic farmland were taken by artificial development then in 1990-2000. Identified trends are expected to change little when next assessment for 2006-2012 becomes available in 2014.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Land take
Figure Intensity of land take 2000 - 2006
Based on Corine Land Cover 2006 and changes between 2000 and 2006, the map shows the land take distribution and intensity for development of urban and other artificial area
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Press Release Water management in Europe faces rising challenges as ecosystems weaken
Water pollution and excessive water use are still harming ecosystems, which are indispensable to Europe’s food, energy, and water supplies. To maintain water ecosystems, farming, planning, energy and transport sectors need to actively engage in managing water within sustainable limits.
Located in Media News
Figure Price development of plastic, paper and glass waste
This figure shows the development in unit price on a monthly basis of plastic, paper and glass waste from January 2000 to December 2011. The prices are calculated as weighted averages of a number of sub waste fractions for export both within and out of the EU.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Highlight Troff document Rio+20 agreement - a modest step in the right direction
At last week’s Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, delegates did not agree to any ambitious treaties or deadlines for dealing with pressing issues such as climate change, food and water scarcity. However, there were many positive signs for the future global environment.
Located in News
Highlight object code Rio+20 – time to rethink the way we use natural resources
This week the Rio de Janeiro summit on sustainable development will open. Rio+20 is an opportunity to look back at changes in our environment since the first Earth Summit in 1992, and also a time to look to the future, re-evaluating the way our economies and our societies depend on the environment and natural resources.
Located in News
Figure Development of municipal waste management in the EU-27, 1995–2010
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Trends in the use of material resources in EU-15, 1970 to 2010 (top) and EU-12, 1992 to 2010
Change 2000 to 2009 in EU-15/EU-12: Total DMC (– 9.9/+ 28.4 %); Biomass (– 2.4/+ 5.8 %); Metals (– 35.9/– 22 %); Non-metal minerals (– 13.5/+ 82.4 %); Fossil fuels (– 5.6/– 5.1%). EU-15 includes Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom. EU-12 includes Bulgaria, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Troff document Domestic Material Consumption (DMC), split by category, in EU-27, 2009
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Water abstractions by water use sector in the 1990s and the period 1997–2009 (latest year)
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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