Energy-related emissions of particulate matter

Indicator Assessment
Prod-ID: IND-131-en
Also known as: ENER 007
expired Created 20 Mar 2009 Published 05 Jul 2010 Last modified 19 Apr 2016, 04:57 PM
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This content has been archived on 12 Nov 2013, reason: Content not regularly updated
Energy-related particulate matter emissions (SO2, NOx, and PM10) in Europe fell by just above 2% between 2005 and 2006. Since 1990, these emissions declined by 49% in the EU and 46% in EEA member countries. The most important reductions were achieved in the energy supply and industry sectors as a result of using lower sulphur content fuels and fuel switching from coal and oil to natural gas. It is expected that in the future concentrations of PM10 in most of the urban areas in the EEA region remain well above the short-term limit air quality values.

Key messages

Energy-related particulate matter emissions (SO2, NOx, and PM10) in Europe fell by just above 2% between 2005 and 2006. Since 1990, these emissions declined by 49% in the EU and 46% in EEA member countries. The most important reductions were achieved in the energy supply and industry sectors as a result of using lower sulphur content fuels and fuel switching from coal and oil to natural gas. It is expected that in the future concentrations of PM10 in most of the urban areas in the EEA region remain well above the short-term limit air quality values.

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Changes (%) in emissions of primary and secondary PM10 particles by source category, 1990-2006, EU-27 (weighted by particle formation factors)

Note: The graph shows the emissions of primary PM10 particles (particulate matter with a diameter of 10 ¼m or less, emitted directly into the atmosphere) and secondary particulate-forming pollutants (the fraction of sulphur dioxide, SO2, nitrogen oxides NOx and ammonia NH3 which, as a result of photo-chemical reactions in the atmosphere, transform into particulate matter with a diameter of 10¼m or less)

Data source:

EEA

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Sectoral shares of primary and secondary particulate matter in total emissions, EU-27

Note: The graph includes the combined emissions of primary PM10 particles (particulate matter with a diameter of 10 ¼m or less, emitted directly into the atmosphere) and secondary particulate-forming pollutants (the fraction of sulphur dioxide, SO2, nitrogen oxides NOx and ammonia NH3 which, as a result of photo-chemical reactions in the atmosphere, transform into particulate matter with a diameter of 10¼m or less)

Data source:

EEA

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Particulate matter emissions have decreased significantly in most EEA member countries, with the top-3 reductions in Luxembourg, Czech Republic and Germany (Figure 3). However, in a few countries emissions increased during the period. In 2006, the average European emitted about 49 Kg of particles. Transport and energy production represented 60% of total particle emissions in Europe in 2006 (figure 2).
Energy-related particle emissions (i.e. aggregated primary and secondary PM10) in the EEA-32 fell by 46% between 1990 and 2006 (-49% in the EU). The most important pollutants were NOx and SO2, which together were responsible for almost 90% of the total energy related particle emissions.
The majority of the reduction in particle emissions from combustion activities between 1990 and 2006 came from the energy supply sector (Figure 1).  Overall, the reduction in emissions has mainly been achieved through a combination of using lower sulphur content fuels, fuel switching from coal and oil to natural gas, the deployment of emission abatement technologies in the energy supply and industry sectors, and an increased market penetration of road vehicles equipped with catalytic converters.
Particle emissions from transport as a whole fell on average by 31 % for the EEA countries between 1990 and 2006. Emissions of primary PM10 and secondary PM10 precursors are expected to further decrease significantly between 2006 and 2010 (despite an increasing popularity of diesel vehicles in many countries), as improved vehicle engine technologies continue to be adopted and stationary fuel combustion emissions are controlled through abatement measures (including particulate traps) or use of low sulphur fuels such as natural gas. Despite the reductions in emissions already achieved, it is expected that in the near future concentrations of PM10 in most of the urban areas in the EEA region remain well above the short-term limit air quality values (EEA 2006). Substantial further reductions in all sectors are therefore needed to reach the air quality limit values set in the EU first Daughter Directive to the Framework Directive on Ambient Air Quality. Additional measures to reduce the sulphur content of diesel and petrol fuels have been decided upon (Directive 2003/17/EC), which include the availability of the sulphur-free (<10 ppm sulphur or 'zero sulphur') fuel, and complete transition to sulphur-free fuel by 2009. Emissions of SO2 and NOx from shipping in European waters are expected to increase by 2010 with an associated increase in primary and secondary PM10 precursors.

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Generic metadata

Topics:

Energy Energy (Primary topic)

Tags:
energy
DPSIR: N/A
Typology: N/A
Indicator codes
  • ENER 007
Geographic coverage:
Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom

Contacts and ownership

EEA Contact Info

Ricardo FERNANDEZ BAYON

Ownership

EEA Management Plan

2010 (note: EEA internal system)

Dates

Filed under:
European Environment Agency (EEA)
Kongens Nytorv 6
1050 Copenhagen K
Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100