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Figure Projected changes in annual and summer precipitation between 1961–1990 and 2071–2100
Projected changes in annual (left) and summer (right) precipitation (%) between 1961-1990 and 2071-2100 as simulated by ENSEMBLES Regional Climate Models for the IPCC SRES A1B emission scenario.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Projected changes in annual and summer precipitation
Projected changes in annual (left) and summer (right) precipitation (%) between 1961-1990 and 2071-2100 as simulated by ENSEMBLES Regional Climate Models for the IPCC SRES A1B emission scenario.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Projected global average sea-level rise, 1990–2100
Past observed and projected sea level rise from various information sources
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Projections of extreme temperatures as represented by the combined number of hot summer (June-August) days (TMAX>35°C) and tropical nights (TMIN>20°C)
Maps show changes in extreme temperature for two future periods, relative to 1961-1990. Extreme temperatures are represented by the combined number of hot summer (June-August) days (TMAX>35°C) and tropical nights (TMIN>20°C). All projections are the average of 5 Regional Climate Model simulations of the EU-ENSEMBLES project using the IPCC SRES A1B emission scenario for the periods 1961-90, 2021-2050 and 2071-2100 (Fischer and Schär, 2010).
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Sea-level changes in Europe October 1992-May 2007
Based on satellite data; trends in mm/year, inverted barometer included, seasonal signal removed
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure C source code The probability of exceeding 2 °C global warming versus CO2 emitted from 2000–2049
Text bellow the image
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Publication Understanding climate change — SOER 2010 thematic assessment
Average global air and ocean temperatures are rising, leading to the melting of snow and ice and rising global mean sea level. Ocean acidification results from higher CO2 concentrations. With unabated greenhouse gas emissions, climate change could lead to an increasing risk of irreversible shifts in the climate system with potentially serious consequences. Temperature rises of more than 1.5–2 °C above pre-industrial levels are likely to cause major societal and environmental disruptions in many regions. The atmospheric CO2 concentration needs to be stabilised at 350–400 parts per million (ppm) in order to have a 50 % chance of limiting global mean temperature increase to 2 °C above pre-industrial levels (according to the IPCC in 2007, and confirmed by later scientific insights).
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Thematic assessments
SOER Message Understanding climate change — key message 1
Global mean temperature in 2009 was 0.7-0.8 °C higher than in pre-industrial times and the decade 2000-2009 was the warmest on record. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) concluded in 2007 that most of the global warming since the middle of the 20th century is very likely to have been due to human influences.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Understanding climate change — SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
SOER Message Understanding climate change — key message 2
Land and ocean sinks have taken up more than half of global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions since 1800, but these natural sinks are vulnerable to climate and land-use change and are highly likely to take up less CO2 in future.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Understanding climate change — SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
SOER Message Understanding climate change — key message 3
The extent of Arctic summer sea ice has declined by about 10 % per decade since 1979. The extent of the minimum ice cover in September 2007 was half the size of the normal minimum extent in the 1950s; the third lowest minimum extent occurred in September 2010. The summer ice is also getting thinner and younger.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Understanding climate change — SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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