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Highlight Assessing climate change impacts in the Pyrenees
Europe’s mountain regions may suffer some of the most severe impacts of climate change. Increasing temperatures can change snow-cover patterns and lead to water shortages and other problems such as reduced ski tourism. Species may also face extinction if unable to move northward or uphill. To investigate these current and potential impacts in the Pyrenees, the European Environment Agency (EEA) and the Pyrenees Working Community (CTP) have recently signed an agreement to work together.
Located in News
Publication Briefing 1/2007 - Climate change and water adaptation issues
Located in Publications
Figure Burnt forest area in five southern European countries
Burnt forest area (in ha) in five southern European countries from 1980 to 2010.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Burnt forest area in five southern European countries - outdated
Burnt forest area (in ha) in five southern European countries from 1980 to 2010.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
File text/texmacs Carbon uptake by forests
(This video has no audio.) The uptake of carbon from the atmosphere by natural vegetation, soils, forests and agricultural land ('terrestrial biosphere') is an important part of the carbon cycle. Carbon uptake by vegetation can lessen the increasing concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere and in Europe can be increased by planting forests and other land management measures. But the additional potential storage capacity for the EU in forestry and agriculture is estimated to be relatively small, and climate change may cause more fires, pests and storm damage as well as increasing water stress, particularly in the Mediterranean area. These conditions would curtail plant growth and reduce the amount of carbon stored in the biosphere. Source: EEA Report No 2/2004 "Impacts of Europe's changing climate" (published 18 Aug 2004)
Located in Environmental topics Climate change Multimedia
Figure Change in global average temperature from three sources (1850–2011)
Left figure: Global average air temperature anomalies (1850 to 2011) in degrees Celsius (°C) relative to a pre-industrial baseline period for 3 analyses of observations: 1) Black line - HadCRUT3 from the UK Met Office Hadley Centre and University of East Anglia Climate Research Unit, baseline period 1850-1899 (Brohan et al., 2006) with the grey area representing the 95% confidence range, 2) Red line – MLOST from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Climatic Data Centre, baseline period 1880-1899 (Smith et al., 2008), and 3) Blue line - GISSTemp from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Institute for Space Studies, baseline period 1880-1899 (Hansen et al., 2010). Upper graph shows annual anomalies and lower graph shows decadal average anomalies for the same datasets. Right figure: Rates of change of global average temperature (1850 to 2011) in ºC per decade, based on 10-year running average of the 3 datasets: 1) Black line - HadCRUT3 from the UK Met Office Hadley Centre and University of East Anglia Climate Research Unit, baseline period 1850-1899 (Brohan et al., 2006), 2) Red line – MLOST from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Climatic Data Centre, baseline period 1880-1899 (Smith et al., 2008), and 3) Blue line - GISSTemp from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Institute for Space Studies, baseline period 1880-1899 (Hansen et al., 2010).
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Animation (swf) C source code header Changing pattern of mountain flower growth
Located in Environmental topics Biodiversity Multimedia
File City of five seas: Environmental Atlas of Europe — Russia
Nizhny Novgorod has a population of 1.3 million and is one of Russia's most important industrial cities. Its process manufacturing plants are heavily reliant on water, supplied from the Volga River and one of its tributaries, the Oka. The region's drinking water also comes from the Upper Volga Basin.
Located in The Environmental Atlas City of five seas Video
File Troff document Climate change — time to act
Climate change is a real and current threat. To avoid major irreversible impacts on society and ecosystems, we must act now.
Located in Media Audiovisuals
Publication Climate change and water adaptation issues
Located in Publications
European Environment Agency (EEA)
Kongens Nytorv 6
1050 Copenhagen K
Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100