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Infographic Europe's climate is changing
A changing climate will affect almost every aspect of our lives. Increased intensity and frequency of rainfall in many parts of Europe will mean frequent and serious flooding events. Elsewhere in Europe, including in southern Europe, higher temperatures and reduced rainfall will mean that many areas might face droughts.
Located in Media Infographics
Figure Projections of extreme temperatures as represented by the combined number of hot summer (June-August) days (TMAX>35°C) and tropical nights (TMIN>20°C)
Maps show changes in extreme temperature for two future periods, relative to 1961-1990. Extreme temperatures are represented by the combined number of hot summer (June-August) days (TMAX>35°C) and tropical nights (TMIN>20°C). All projections are the average of 5 Regional Climate Model simulations of the EU-ENSEMBLES project using the IPCC SRES A1B emission scenario for the periods 1961-90, 2021-2050 and 2071-2100 (Fischer and Schär, 2010).
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Observed and projected Arctic September sea-ice extent, 1900–2100
Observed and projected Arctic September sea-ice extent
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Melting area 1979–2008 and mass change 2003–2009 of the Greenland ice sheet
Note: The maps on the left show the area of the Greenland ice sheet with at least one day of surface melting in summer. The diagram on the left shows the cumulated melt area, which is defined as the annual total sum of every daily ice sheet melt area. For example, if a particular area is melting on 20 days in a given year, it is counted 20 times.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Troff document Ocean acidity over the past 25 million years and projected to 2100
The ‘pH’ is a measure of acidity – the lower the number the more acidic the ocean becomes. On a geological timescale, ocean pH has been relatively stable. Recently, oceans have been acidifying fast and this is projected to continue at a rate unprecedented for millions of years.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Cumulative specific net mass balance of selected glaciers from European glaciated regions, 1946–2008
Cumulative specific net mass balance of selected glaciers from European glaciated regions
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure C source code The probability of exceeding 2 °C global warming versus CO2 emitted from 2000–2049
Text bellow the image
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Troff document Potential tipping elements with direct impacts on Europe
Colours show population density
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure text/texmacs Potential climatic tipping elements
Tipping elements are regional-scale features of the climate that could exhibit threshold-type behaviour in response to human-driven climate change – that is, a small amount of climate change at a critical point could trigger an abrupt and/or irreversible shift in the tipping element. The consequences of such shifts for societies and ecosystems are likely to be severe. Question marks indicate systems whose status as tipping elements is particularly uncertain. There are other potential tipping elements that are missing from the map, for example shallow-water coral reefs (Veron et al. 2009) threatened in part by ocean acidification
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Arctic summer sea-ice age 1981–2000 compared with 2007, 2008, and 2009
These images compare ice age, a proxy for ice thickness, in 2007, 2008, 2009, and the 1981–2000 average. 2009 saw an increase in second-year ice over 2008. At the end of summer 2009, 32% of the ice cover was second-year ice and three-year and older ice were 19% of the total ice cover, the lowest in the satellite record.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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Denmark
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