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Publication Soil — SOER 2010 thematic assessment
Nearly all of the food and fibres used by humans are produced on soil. Soil is also essential for water and ecosystem health. It is second only to the oceans as a global carbon sink, with an important role in the potential slowing of climate change. Soil functions depend on a multitude of soil organisms which makes it an important part of our biodiversity. Nevertheless, soil in many parts of Europe is being over-exploited, degraded and irreversibly lost due to impacts from industrial activities and land use change, leading to soil sealing, contamination, erosion and loss of organic carbon. Due to these problems, legislation for the protection of soils has been proposed at EU level.
Located in The European environment — state and outlook 2015 Thematic assessments
SOER Message (Deprecated) Marine and coastal environment — key message 4
Sea surface temperatures and sea level are rising and likely to rise further. The resulting shifts in the geographical and seasonal distribution of marine and coastal species will require adaptations in the management of fisheries and natural habitats to ensure environmental sustainability. Increasing temperatures and the acidification of the world’s oceans due to higher CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere also affect coral reefs in Europe´s overseas territories, which are important centres of biodiversity.
Located in The European environment — state and outlook 2015 Marine and coastal environment — SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
Publication chemical/x-pdb Marine and coastal environment — SOER 2010 thematic assessment
European marine regions include the north-east Atlantic and Arctic oceans, and the Mediterranean, Black and Baltic seas. Human activities — such as fishing, aquaculture and agriculture — and climate change cause large and severe impacts on Europe's coastal and marine ecosystems. The EU objective of halting biodiversity loss by 2010 has not been met in either the coastal or the marine environment. Recognising the need for an integrated ecosystem-based approach to reduce pressures, the EU Integrated Maritime Policy allows for the development of sea-related activities in a sustainable manner. Its environmental pillar, the Marine Strategy Framework Directive, aims to deliver 'good environmental status' of the marine environment by 2020, and the Common Fisheries Policy will be reformed in 2012 with the aim of achieving sustainable fisheries. Complementary policy efforts include the EU Water Framework Directive and other freshwater legislation, and the Habitats and Birds Directives.
Located in The European environment — state and outlook 2015 Thematic assessments
Publication Understanding climate change — SOER 2010 thematic assessment
Average global air and ocean temperatures are rising, leading to the melting of snow and ice and rising global mean sea level. Ocean acidification results from higher CO2 concentrations. With unabated greenhouse gas emissions, climate change could lead to an increasing risk of irreversible shifts in the climate system with potentially serious consequences. Temperature rises of more than 1.5–2 °C above pre-industrial levels are likely to cause major societal and environmental disruptions in many regions. The atmospheric CO2 concentration needs to be stabilised at 350–400 parts per million (ppm) in order to have a 50 % chance of limiting global mean temperature increase to 2 °C above pre-industrial levels (according to the IPCC in 2007, and confirmed by later scientific insights).
Located in The European environment — state and outlook 2015 Thematic assessments
SOER Message (Deprecated) Air pollution — key message 2
As the amounts of acidifying air pollutants have fallen, the area of acid-sensitive ecosystems (such as freshwaters and forest soils) adversely affected in Europe has considerably reduced. Nonetheless, biological recovery in freshwaters is slow. The area of sensitive terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems affected by an excess input of atmospheric nitrogen in the EEA-32 has only diminished slightly between 1990 and 2010. The EU’s long-term objective of not exceeding the so-called critical atmospheric pollutant loads, which ecosystems can tolerate, has not been met.
Located in The European environment — state and outlook 2015 Air pollution — SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
SOER Key fact (Deprecated) Air pollution - key fact 3
In the EEA-32 countries, the area of sensitive ecosystems exposed to excess acidification from air pollution fell by about 80 % from 1990–2010.
Located in The European environment — state and outlook 2015 Air pollution — SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key facts
SOER Message (Deprecated) Soil — key message 2
Certain regions of Europe are affected by soil salinisation, acidification, landslides or desertification, with considerable economic and environmental consequences. Soil degradation is accelerating in many parts of Europe, exacerbated by human activities such as the inappropriate management of arable land, grassland and forest land.
Located in The European environment — state and outlook 2015 Soil — SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
Figure Emission trends of tropospheric (ground-level) ozone precursors (EEA member countries, EU-27)
This chart shows past emission trends of nitrogen oxides (NOx), non-methane volatile organic compunds (NMVOC), carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4) in the EEA-32 and EU-27 group of countries. In addition - for the EU-27 - the aggregated Member State 2010 emission ceilings for NOx and NMVOC are shown.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Emission trends of acidifying pollutants (EEA member countries, EU-27)
This chart shows past emission trends of nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulphur oxides (SOx) and ammonia (NH3) in the EEA-32 and EU-27 group of countries. In addition - for the EU-27 - the aggregated Member State 2010 emission ceiling for the respective pollutants are shown.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Contributions by sector for emissions of acidifying pollutants (EEA member countries)
The contribution made by different sectors to emissions of acidifying pollutants
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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