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Figure Troff document Trends in air passenger transport demand and GDP
Trends in air passenger transport demand and GDP. The two curves show the development in GDP and air passenger transport volumes, while the columns show the level of annual decoupling. Green indicates faster growth in GDP than in transport while red indicates stronger growth in transport than in GDP. Aviation passenger demand data are provisional estimates from the European Commission DG MOVE for domestic and intra-EU27 aviation. GDP data for Lichtenstein is not included as it is not available. The ratio of annual growth of passenger transport to GDP, measured in 2000 prices, determines the amount of coupling between GDP and transport. The decoupling indicator, depicted by the green bars, is calculated as unity minus the coupling ratio; so a positive score indicates decoupling (i.e. transport demand grows less slowly than GDP), with a negative score showing the opposite (i.e. transport demand outpaces GDP growth)
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
File Expert interview: transport and environment
Peder Jensen, EEA transport and the environment expert. Transport is harmful to the environment in many different ways. The most visible effect of transport is some of the emissions that we see: we can see the exhaust gas coming out of a car and at certain times it's very dirty and very dark. It's a very visible way where it's harming the environment, harming the air that we are all breathing. But there are also effects that are not quite so visible - when we are burning fuel in our engines we are emitting a lot of different gases and some of them are invisible greenhouse gases that help trap the heat in the atmosphere to get the earth to go warmer. One of the other important effects of transport is the noise impact. Noise means that people have a hard time sleeping, that they therefore don't get the rest that they need. It also affects the animals, disturbs their life, if roads or railroads run through nature areas it therefore means a reduced quality of life for both animals and people. Finally, transport infrastructure has a tendency to fragment natural habitats for animals. Lots of animals are disturbed by roads, they cannot cross the road, they are either scared off by the noise or they can't find ways to cross these different infrastructures and this means that the habitats they are living in don't work so well for their reproduction.
Located in Environmental topics Transport Multimedia
File Better and cleaner urban transport for Europe
Urban traffic is responsible for 40% of CO2 road transport emissions. In Europe, 9 citizens out of 10 are exposed to harmful particle emissions that are higher than the tolerated norm. Time wasted in traffic jams will soon cost 1% of the European Union’s GDP. In terms of urban transport, the European Union contributes to financing infrastructures and equipment, but also supports projects aiming at replacing petrol by alternative and clean fuels. Most cities in the EU are putting in place a mix of advanced technologies and transport policy measures, such as alternative traffic management systems to combine mobility and quality of life. The EU cooperates with cities, notably through the CIVITAS network, to favour the exchange of know-how and best practices at European level.
Located in Environmental topics Transport Multimedia
Figure Estimated share of pre Euro/conventional and Euro I-V heavy-duty vehicles, buses and coaches and conventional and Euro 1-3 mopeds and motorcycles in 30 EEA member countries, 1995, 2005 and 2011
The graph shows the estimated share of pre Euro/conventional and Euro I-V heavy-duty vehicles, buses and coaches and conventional and Euro 1-3 mopeds and motorcycles in 30 EEA member countries, 1995, 2005 and 2011.
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Figure D source code Decoupling of freight transport demand in the Western Balkans, 2000–2007
Decoupling of freight transport demand in the Western Balkans, 2000–2007
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Figure PM10 mean and maximum values of annual averages for traffic and urban background stations
Station pairs from capital cities were preferred, but when not available the next largest city for which data was available was chosen
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Figure D source code EEA scorecard 2005 - Freight transport demand
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Figure Troff document Distance-related charges for the EU-15 in 2002 (EUR/vehicle-km) and minimum estimates for marginal cost
The figures show the distance-related charges for petrol and diesel cars in 2002
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Figure Passenger transport activity growth for EU 25
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Figure Road transport's share increases strongly in EU-10
Note: Road freight transport is assigned to the country of origin of the transport vehicle in EU statistics rather than to where the vehicles drive
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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1050 Copenhagen K
Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100