Personal tools

next
previous
items

Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Sound and independent information
on the environment

You are here: Home / Data and maps
24 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type























































































New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
Indicator Assessment Chlorophyll in transitional, coastal and marine waters (CSI 023) - Assessment published Mar 2013
In 2010, the highest summer chlorophyll-a concentrations were observed in coastal areas and estuaries where nutrient concentrations are also generally high (see CSI 021 Nutrients in transitional, coastal and marine waters). These include the Gulf of Riga, Gulf of Gdansk, Gulf of Finland and along the German coast in the Baltic Sea, coastal areas in Belgium and The Netherlands in the Greater North Sea and in few locations along the coast of Ireland and France in the Celtic Seas and Bay of Biscay, respectively. High chlorophyll concentrations were also observed along the Gulf of Lions and in Montenegro coastal waters in the Mediterranean Sea, and along Romanian coastal waters in the Black Sea. Low summer chlorophyll concentrations were mainly observed in the Kattegat and open sea stations in the Greater North Sea, and in open sea stations in southern Baltic Sea.  Between 1985 to 2010, decreasing chlorophyll concentrations (showed in 8% of all the stations in the European seas reported to the EEA) were predominantly found along the southern coast of the Greater North Sea, along the Finnish coast in the Bothnian Bay in the Baltic Sea and in a few stations in the Western Mediterranean Sea and Adriatic Sea. In the Black Sea, it was not possible to make an overall assessment due to the lack of time series data. Increasing concentrations (observed in 5% of the reported stations) were generally observed in coastal locations in the Northern Baltic Sea but also in the open sea stations outside the north of the Celtic Seas. Most stations (87%) however showed no changes over time.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Chlorophyll in transitional, coastal and marine waters
Figure Trend in summer chlorophyll-a concentrations in coastal and open waters of the Baltic, Celtic and Mediterranean Seas and NE Atlantic, 1985-2010
This figure shows stationwise trends in chlorophyll-a concentrations in coastal and open waters of the Baltic, North East Atlantic (Greater North Sea, Celtic Seas, Bay of Biscay), and Mediterranean Sea (Western Mediterranean Sea, Adriatic Sea) (% of stations showing statistically significant change, within the years 1985–2010). Numbers in parentheses indicates number of stations included in the analysis for each country. "Open sea" is the total of all off-shore stations (>20km) within a (sub)region.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Observed change in chlorophyll-a concentrations in coastal and open waters of the Baltic, North East Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea, 1985-2010
The map shows stations with a statistically significant decrease (green), increase (red) or no trend (yellow) within the period 1985-2010. Selected stations must have at least data in the period from 2007 to present and at least 5 years data in all. Note that the open sea stations around Faroe Islands are included under Celtic Seas.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure D source code Conservation status of river and lake habitat types and species, and conservation status of coastal and transitional waters habitat types of European interest
-
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure D source code Chemical status of transitional and coastal waters per RBD — percentage of water bodies not achieving good chemical status
-
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure D source code Percentage of transitional (a) and coastal (b) water bodies in poor and good chemical status, by count of water bodies
The graphs illustrate the chemical status of transitional and coastal water bodies as percentage of water bodies in poor and good chemical status, by count of water bodies.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Distribution of chemical status of groundwater, rivers, lakes, transitional and coastal waters.
Number of Member States contributing to the dataset: Groundwater (26); Rivers (25); Lakes (22); Transitional (15) and Coastal (20). Percentages shown for rivers, lakes, transitional and coastal are by water body count. Groundwater percentages, however, are expressed by area. The total number of water bodies is shown in parenthesis. Data from Sweden are excluded from surface water data illustrated in the figure. This is because Sweden contributed a disproportionately large amount of data and, classified all its surface waters as poor status since levels of mercury found within biota in both fresh and coastal waters exceed quality standards.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure D source code Ecological status/potential of and proportion of water bodies affected by pollution and hydromorphological pressures for transitional (left panel (a, b, c)) and coastal (right panel (d, e, f)) water bodies, by sea region
-
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Percentage of natural, heavily modified, artificial and unknown status for river, lake, transitional and coastal water bodies
-
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Proportion of classified water bodies in different RBDs affected by hydromorphological pressures, for rivers and lakes (left panel) and for coastal and transitional waters (right panel)
The percentage is based on total number of classified water bodies. See the indicator specification for more details.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
European Environment Agency (EEA)
Kongens Nytorv 6
1050 Copenhagen K
Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100