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File Late lessons II Chapter 14 - Climate change: science and the precautionary priniple
Located in Publications Late lessons from early warnings: science, precaution, innovation Single chapters
Figure Projected relative change of annual maximum daily mean wind speed between 1961-2000 and 2050 using different models
Data are calculated for 10 m height using the + 2 oC scenario for 2050 (IPCC-SRES A1B emission scenarios) and the reference climate (1961-2000) from three similar models (left) and one different model, MIROCHi (right).
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Average annual changes in fire danger level 1958-2006
Based on use of Seasonal Severity Rating (SSR)
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Percentage of Europe experiencing moderate drought conditions during the 20th century
Expressed as standardized precipitation indices (SPI) for time scales of 12 months
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure C source code header Estimated global warming at which the onset of the events could occur versus their impact
Temperature increase (above 1990 level) at which the various events could occur and an estimate of their impact. The impact scale has subjective qualifications (‘minor’, ‘notable’, ‘major’ and ‘devastating’), which were assigned on the basis of the geographical scale (from ‘regional’ to ‘continental’ and ‘global’) and the character of the damages (‘light’, ‘moderate’, ‘heavy’ or ‘extreme’). The level of scientific understanding, as well as the understanding of possible impacts for most of these events is low. The shapes and sizes of the ovals do not represent uncertainties in impact and temperature onset of eventualities and these uncertainties may be significant.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
File Sustainable cooling helps fight global warming
In Europe, summer heat waves are becoming harder to bear. The demand for air conditioning is on the rise, especially in office buildings. Yet buildings alone represent 40% of the EU's energy consumption, and air conditioning accounts for a significant part of it. In addition, air conditioning produces greenhouse gas emissions, aggravating global warming and putting at risk European climate protection commitments. The solution: reduce the energy requirements of existing air conditioning systems and change the way buildings are designed and used to achieve sustainable summer comfort without active cooling.
Located in Environmental topics Energy Multimedia
Indicator Assessment Greenhouse gas emission trends (CSI 010/CLIM 050) - Assessment published Mar 2009
According to first estimates by EEA for the year 2010, EU-27 greenhouse gas emissions increased by 2.4 % compared to 2009 (with a margin of error of +/- 0.3 %). This was due to the return to economic growth in many countries and a colder winter leading to an increased heating demand. However, the increase in emissions was contained by a move from coal to natural gas and the sustained strong growth in renewable energy generation. EU‑27 emissions were 15.5 % below the 1990 level. This 2010 increase follows a 7 % drop in 2009 (compared to 2008), largely due to the economic recession and the growth of renewable energy generation. Between 1990 and 2010, greenhouse gas emissions in the EU-27 decreased in all main emitting sectors except in the transport sector, where they increased considerably. In the EU-15, CO 2  emissions from public electricity and heat production also increased. In the EU-15, estimated 2010 GHG emissions increased by 2.3 % (+/– 0.7) compared to 2009. This implies that EU‑15 greenhouse gas emissions were approximately 10.6 % below the 1990 level in 2010 (1) or 10.7 % below the base-year level. The European Union remains well on track to achieve its Kyoto Protocol target (an 8% reduction of its greenhouse gas emissions compared to base-year level, to be achieved during the period from 2008 to 2012). 2010 emissions of all EU-12 Member States that have a Kyoto target were well below their Kyoto target, except in Slovenia. A detailed assessment of progress towards Kyoto targets and 2020 targets in Europe is provided in EEA's 2011 report on Greenhouse gas emission trends and projections .
Located in Data and maps Indicators Greenhouse gas emission trends
File Global warning: early warnings on adaptation
Climate change is the ever growing reality faced by the inhabitants of the Arctic regions. They must adapt to the changing landscapes, increasing temperatures, disappearing species, new hunting techniques. In this video, several leaders of indigenous peoples' organizations, represented in the Arctic Council, share their thoughts and concerns about the changes in their lifestyles brought on by the changing climate.
Located in Environmental topics Climate change Multimedia
File Living with Climate change
Global warming is happening. Temperatures have already risen by 0.76 degrees since the industrial revolution and are projected to rise further by 1.8 - 4 degrees by the end of the century. The last time climate change happened at this pace was 125,000 years ago and led to a 4-6 metre sea level rise. Global warming at the upper end of the scale predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change would have catastrophic consequences for Europe. Up to 30% of plant, animal and bird species would be wiped out and the threat of natural disasters such as landslides, floods and mudslides would increase significantly.
Located in Environmental topics Climate change Multimedia
File Europe leads the fight against climate change
The Earth is rapidly getting warmer, threatening serious and even catastrophic disruption to our societies and to the natural environment on which we depend. Over the course of the 20th century the average temperature increased by around 0.6 C globally, by almost 1 C in Europe and by no less than 5 C in the Arctic. This man-made warming is already having many disruptive effects around the globe. Sea levels are rising as a result of melting glaciers and ice sheets, threatening to flood low-lying communities. Extreme weather conditions; floods, droughts, storms are becoming more severe, more frequent and more costly in some parts of the world. And many endangered species may be pushed to extinction over the coming decades as climate change affects their traditional habitats.
Located in Environmental topics Climate change Multimedia
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