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Article Air legislation in Europe
Air pollution is not the same everywhere. Different pollutants are released into the atmosphere from a wide range of sources. Once in the atmosphere, they can transform into new pollutants and spread around the world. Designing and implementing policies to address this complexity are not easy tasks. Below is an overview of air legislation in the European Union.
Located in Signals — well-being and the environment Signals 2013 Articles
Figure C source code Concentrations of selected metals and organic contaminants in mussels in the north-east Atlantic Ocean (A), Mediterranean Sea (B) and herring (muscle) for the Baltic Sea (C).
It should be noted that the lack of consistent or reliable data from the marine conventions or EEA counties inhibits adequate assessment of concentrations and trends of hazardous substances in European marine water
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Concentrations of hazardous substances in fish from the north-east Atlantic and Baltic regions
It should be noted that the lack of consistent or reliable data from the marine conventions or EEA counties inhibits adequate assessment of concentrations and trends of hazardous substances in European marine water
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Indicator Assessment Progress in management of contaminated sites (CSI 015/LSI 003) - Assessment published Aug 2007
Soil contamination requiring clean up is present at approximately 250000 sites in the EEA member countries, according to recent estimates. And this number is expected to grow. Potentially polluting activities are estimated to have occurred at nearly 3 million sites (including the 250000 sites already mentioned) and investigation is needed to establish whether remediation is required. If current investigation trends continue, the number of sites needing remediation will increase by 50% by 2025. By contrast, more than 80000 sites have been cleaned up in the last 30 years in the countries where data on remediation is available. Although the range of polluting activities (and their relative importance as localised sources of soil contamination) may vary considerably across Europe, industrial and commercial activities as well as the treatment and disposal of waste are reported to be the most important sources. National reports indicate that heavy metals and mineral oil are the most frequent soil contaminants at investigated sites, while mineral oil and chlorinated hydrocarbons are the most frequent contaminants found in groundwater. A considerable share of remediation expenditure, about 35% on average, comes from public budgets. Although considerable efforts have been made already, it will take decades to clean up a legacy of contamination.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Progress in management of contaminated sites
Figure Remediation technologies
The graph shows remediation technologies applied in the surveyed countries as percentages of number of sites per type of treatment
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
SOER Message Soil — key message 5
Industrialisation and poor management have left thousands of contaminated sites throughout Europe, resulting in human health impacts and environmental problems including groundwater contamination. While some countries have made significant progress, the identification and remediation of contaminated sites in many countries is patchy, with limited progress over the past five years.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Soil — SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
Policy Document C source code Commission Regulation 1881/2006/EC of 19 December 2006
Commission Regulation (EC) No. 1881/2006 of 19 December 2006 setting maximum levels for certain contaminants in foodstuff.
Located in Environmental policy document catalogue
Figure Probable problem areas of local contamination in Europe
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Overview of progress in the management of contaminated sites in Europe
The graphs shows the status in investigation and clean-up of contaminated sites in Europe
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Overview of progress in management of soil contamination in WCE and some SEE countries
SOER2010-title: Contamited sites in Europe, 2006. The graphs shows the status of identification and clean‑up of contaminated sites in Europe as reported to the European Environment Agency through the Eionet priority data flows on contaminated sites. While trends vary across Europe, it is clear that the remediation of contaminated sites is still a significant undertaking.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100