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Animation (swf) D source code Green tip - the pond
Located in Media Audiovisuals
Figure Octet Stream Greenhouse gas footprints per capita for transport in UK local authorities and urban-rural pattern
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Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Publication text/x-sh Hazardous substances in Europe's fresh and marine waters — An overview
Chemicals are an essential part of our daily lives and are used to produce consumer goods, to protect or restore our health and to boost food production, to name but a few examples. Some chemicals, however, are hazardous, raising concerns for the environment and human health. Hazardous substances are emitted to fresh and marine waters via a number of pathways and can have detrimental effects on aquatic biota. Humans can be exposed to hazardous substances in water through the ingestion of contaminated drinking water and the consumption of contaminated freshwater fish and seafood. A wide range of legislation now exists in Europe to address the release of hazardous substances to the environment, including water. New challenges exist, however, including the issues of chemical mixtures and emerging pollutants.
Located in Publications
File Improving the environment in Europe's cities
Four out of five of all Europeans live in towns and cities and the European Commission wants to help make urban areas a better place to live.
Located in Environmental topics Urban environment Multimedia
Highlight Increasing fragmentation of landscape threatens European wildlife
Roads, motorways, railways, intensive agriculture and urban developments are breaking up Europe’s landscapes into ever-smaller pieces, with potentially devastating consequences for flora and fauna across the continent, according to a new joint report from the European Environment Agency (EEA) and the Swiss Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN). The report, 'Landscape fragmentation in Europe', demonstrates how areas of land are often unable to support high levels of biodiversity when they are split into smaller and smaller parcels.
Located in News
Highlight Land use conflicts necessitate integrated policy
Demand for land in Europe is high. Food and biomass production, housing, infrastructure and recreation all compete for space, with impacts on our climate, biodiversity and ecosystem services. In a recent assessment, the European Environment Agency (EEA) analyses land use change in Europe, concluding that we need an integrated policy approach based on reliable data to balance sectoral demands and manage land sustainably.
Located in News
Publication Land-use scenarios for Europe: Qualitative and quantitative analysis on a European scale (PRELUDE)
Located in Publications
Publication Landscape fragmentation in Europe
Joint EEA-FOEN report
Located in Publications
Image Living facade at the European Environment Agency
The living facade at the European Environment Agency - more high resolution images: http://www.flickr.com/photos/45497914@N05/
Located in Media Images
Image Living facade at the European Environment Agency
More high resolution images: http://www.flickr.com/photos/45497914@N05/
Located in Media Images
European Environment Agency (EEA)
Kongens Nytorv 6
1050 Copenhagen K
Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100