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File Biodiversity protection – beyond 2010
2010 will be a major milestone for biodiversity policy both in the EU and globally. It will be the year of the full evaluation of the delivery to the EU Biodiversity Action Plan and as well the UN International Year for Biodiversity.
Located in Environmental topics Biodiversity Multimedia
File CityBEES
In Copenhagen, the capital of Denmark, millions of Honey bees are working hard for the city. These busy employees provide not only delicious honey to city people, but a blooming environment in the parks and greens around the capital.
Located in The Environmental Atlas City bees Video
Publication Climate change: the cost of inaction and the cost of adaptation
Located in Publications
Figure Development of Ecological Footprint and Available Biocapacity per capita in EEA Member Countries
The ecological footprint is a measure of the area needed to support a population's lifestyle. This includes the consumption of food, fuel, wood, and fibres. Pollution, such as carbon dioxide emissions, is also counted as part of the footprint. Biocapacity measures how biologically productive land is. It is measured in 'global hectares': a hectare with the world average biocapacity. Biologically productive land includes cropland, pasture, forests and fisheries
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Ecological footprint compared with biocapacity (left), and different components of the footprint (right) in EEA countries, 1961–2006
The ecological footprint is a measure of the area needed to support a population's lifestyle. This includes the consumption of food, fuel, wood, and fibres. Pollution, such as carbon dioxide emissions, is also counted as part of the footprint. Biocapacity measures how biologically productive land is. It is measured in 'global hectares': a hectare with the world average biocapacity. Biologically productive land includes cropland, pasture, forests and fisheries
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Publication EEA Briefing 2/2008 - Ecosystem services - accounting for what matters
Located in Publications
Publication EEA Signals 2009 - Key environmental issues facing Europe
Signals is published by the European Environment Agency (EEA) at the start of each year and provides snapshot stories on issues of interest both to the environmental policy debate and the wider public for the upcoming year. The eight stories addressed are not exhaustive but have been selected on the basis of their relevance to the current environmental policy debate in Europe. They address priority issues of climate change, nature and biodiversity, the use of natural resources and health.
Located in Publications
Publication EU 2010 Biodiversity Baseline
The EU 2010 Biodiversity Baseline provides facts and figures on the state and trends of the different biodiversity and ecosystem components. It thereby supports the EU in developing the post‑2010 sub‑targets and provides factual data for measuring and monitoring progress in the EU from 2011 to 2020.
Located in Publications
Publication Europe's ecological backbone: recognising the true value of our mountains
Europe's mountain areas have social, economic and environmental capital of significance for the entire continent. This importance has been recognised since the late 19th century through national legislation; since the 1970s through regional structures for cooperation; and since the 1990s through regional legal instruments for the Alps and Carpathians. The European Union (EU) first recognised the specific characteristics of mountain areas in 1975 through the designation of Less Favoured Areas (LFAs). During the last decade, EU cohesion policy and the Treaty of Lisbon have both focused specifically on mountains.
Located in Publications
Figure European land cover in 2006, main land-cover categories of Europe
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Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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