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File chemical/x-pdb 50 years of protecting Europe's environment
Today the European Union has the most environmentally friendly arsenal of rules in the world and has done more to tackle pressing ecological problems, such as climate change, than any other major power. But it has not always been like this. Caring for the environment did not feature in the Treaty of Rome, the document that gave birth to the modern day EU. Yet environmental problems were never far away. Europe’s love affair with the car was moving into top gear, industry was busy belching out pollutants and raw sewage was being pumped into our rivers and seas.
Located in Environmental topics Policy instruments Multimedia
File A forest built on coal: Environmental Atlas of Europe — Germany
When the coal mining era came to an end, large industrial areas in Germany’s Ruhr district were abandoned and many of them had to find a new direction. While decision-makers were still discussing how to tackle the situation, nature had already decided and many of the abandoned mines became beautiful wooded areas. The mine tracks, now covered with trees and bushes, form a perfect corridor for the movement of species from one site to another, contributing to increased biodiversity in these areas known as “urban forests”.
Located in The Environmental Atlas A forest built on coal Video
Article A tapestry of life — Biodiversity: our life support 'eco-system'
Located in Signals — well-being and the environment Signals 2010
Highlight OpenDocument Spreadsheet A walk in the woods on May 22 - International Biodiversity Day
Forests are some of the most important ecosystems in Europe, and are home to many thousands of species. Although the amount of forest cover is stable across Europe, it is declining worldwide, and the rich variety of life on Earth is also following this downward trend. On 22 May, International Biodiversity Day, the European Environment Agency invites you to explore and enjoy biodiversity in Europe’s forests.
Located in News
Figure Actual and potential future alien plant invasion hotspots under two emissions scenarios
The map shows the potential future alien plant invasion hotspots in Austria and Germany under climate change, based on 30 invasive alien vascular plant species and the SRES A2 and B2 emissions scenarios. Colours mark number of invasive alien species suitable in an area.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Publication Adapting to climate change - SOER 2010 thematic assessment
Climate change is happening and will continue to have far-reaching consequences for human and natural systems. Impacts and vulnerabilities differ considerably across regions, territories and economic sectors in Europe. Strategies to adapt to climate change are necessary to manage impacts even if global temperature stays below a 2 °C increase above the pre-industrial level. The EU adaptation framework aims at developing a comprehensive strategy by 2013, to be supported by a clearinghouse for sharing and maintaining information on climate change impacts, vulnerability and adaptation.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Thematic assessments
SOER Message Adapting to climate change — key message 2
A temperature rise of 2 °C or more above pre-industrial levels is likely to cause major societal, economic and environmental disruption, making it challenging for human and natural systems to adapt at affordable costs. Climate change will affect the vulnerability of European society to an array of threats to human health, almost all economic sectors, ecosystem goods and services and biodiversity.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Adapting to climate change - SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
Figure Agricultural land in proposed sites of Community Interest (pSCIs) under the habitats directive, as a proportion of the total areas designated as pSCI sites
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Publication Agriculture and environment in EU-15 - the IRENA indicator report
Located in Publications
Figure Alien species in European marine/estuarine waters (October 2008)
How to read the graph: In the 1990s, the total number of alien marine species increased to around 1 000
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
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