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Publication application/vnd.symbian.install The European environment – state and outlook 2010: Synthesis
The SOER 2010 Synthesis provides an overview of the European environment's state, trends and prospects, integrating the main findings of SOER 2010.
Located in The European environment — state and outlook 2015 Synthesis
SOER Message (Deprecated) Water resources: quantity and flows — key message 5
Europe cannot endlessly increase its water supply, we must reduce demand. Policies are needed to encourage demand management. Demand measures could include the use of economic instruments; water loss controls; water-reuse and recycling; increased efficiency of domestic, agricultural and industrial water use; and water-saving campaigns supported by public education programmes.
Located in The European environment — state and outlook 2015 Water resources: quantity and flows - SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
SOER Message (Deprecated) Material resources and waste — key message 4
The management of waste has improved, with many countries recycling and recovering more, but more efforts are needed if the EU is to become a 'recycling society'. Implementation of existing legislation remains crucial, especially on the illegal shipments of waste, illegal or sub-standard landfilling, and packaging and electric and electronic equipment waste management.
Located in The European environment — state and outlook 2015 Material resources and waste — SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
Publication Material resources and waste — SOER 2010 thematic assessment
The European economy needs huge amounts of resources to function. Apart from consuming minerals, metals, concrete and wood, Europe burns fossil fuels and uses land to satisfy the needs of its citizens. Demand for materials is so intense that between 20 and 30 % of the resources we use are now imported. At the other end of the materials chain, the EU economy generates around six tons of waste per person every year. With the boom in international trade, EU consumption and production may potentially damage ecosystems and human health not only within but also far beyond its borders.
Located in The European environment — state and outlook 2015 Thematic assessments
Figure Recycling of packaging waste by country, 2007
Recycle of packaging waste
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure The rate of recycling versus incineration with energy recovery of municipal waste, 2005
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Trends in recycling of municipal waste, latest available five years
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Publication Diverting waste from landfill - Effectiveness of waste-management policies in the European Union
Issued in 1999, the Landfill Directive marked a decisive shift from landfill towards the EU's new waste hierarchy, which prioritises waste prevention, followed by re-use, recycling and recovery, and seeks to avoid landfilling wherever feasible. The Landfill Directive set targets for progressively reducing the amount of biodegradable municipal waste landfilled in the period to 2016. A decade on from the Landfill Directive's enactment seems a fitting time to review progress and extract key lessons for policy-makers in Europe and elsewhere. Through individual and comparative analyses of waste management in five countries and one sub-national region (Estonia, Finland, the Flemish Region of Belgium, Germany, Hungary and Italy), as well as an econometric analysis of the EU–25 Member States, this report seeks to answer a number of important questions, including: To what extent was waste management practice changed in the last decade? How much of the change was due to the Landfill Directive (and other EU instruments)? What measures and institutional arrangements did countries introduce? Which measures and arrangements proved most effective in different national and regional contexts?
Located in Publications
Publication EEA Signals 2009 - Key environmental issues facing Europe
Signals is published by the European Environment Agency (EEA) at the start of each year and provides snapshot stories on issues of interest both to the environmental policy debate and the wider public for the upcoming year. The eight stories addressed are not exhaustive but have been selected on the basis of their relevance to the current environmental policy debate in Europe. They address priority issues of climate change, nature and biodiversity, the use of natural resources and health.
Located in Publications
File Business and environment: Eco-technologies
Green innovation for sustainable development. The European Union’s environmental technologies industry is a promising industrial sector with a vast potential for growth. At present it employs more than 2 million people across the Union and has a market value of roughly €200 billion. The EU is a leading supplier of environmental technologies in the world, representing about one-third of the global market for these technologies. It is for their environmental benefits but also for their contribution to economic growth that the European Commission is actively promoting the development and the uptake of environmental technologies.
Located in Environmental topics Green economy Multimedia
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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