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Press Release Higher EU greenhouse gas emissions in 2010 due to economic recovery and cold winter
Greenhouse gas emissions increased in 2010, as a result of both economic recovery in many countries after the 2009 recession and a colder winter. Nonetheless, emissions growth was somewhat contained by continued strong growth in renewable energy sources. These figures from the greenhouse gas inventory published by the European Environment Agency (EEA) today confirm earlier EEA estimates.
Located in Media News
Press Release EU greenhouse gases in 2011: more countries on track to meet Kyoto targets, emissions fall 2.5 %
Emissions of greenhouse gases in the European Union (EU) fell on average by 2.5 % from 2010 to 2011, although several countries increased emissions. Almost all European countries are individually on track towards their commitments under the Kyoto Protocol compared to last year, according to two reports published today by the European Environment Agency (EEA).
Located in Media News
Press Release Greenhouse gases: 2011 emissions lower than previously estimated
Greenhouse gases fell by 3.3 % in the EU in 2011, leading to the lowest level of emissions in reports going back to 1990. The decrease in 2011 was also the third largest over this period, according to official data compiled by the European Environment Agency (EEA) and reported by the EU to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).
Located in Media News
Publication Air pollution impacts from carbon capture and storage (CCS)
Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) consists of the capture of carbon dioxide (CO2) from power plants and/or CO2-intensive industries such as refineries, cement, iron and steel, its subsequent transport to a storage site, and finally its injection into a suitable underground geological formation for the purposes of permanent storage. It is considered to be one of the medium term 'bridging technologies' in the portfolio of available mitigation actions for stabilising concentrations of atmospheric CO2, the main greenhouse gas (GHG).
Located in Publications
Animation (swf) Emissions trading mindstretcher
Located in Environmental topics Climate change Multimedia
Publication Monitoring CO2 emissions from passenger cars and vans in 2013
This report presents final data for both vehicle types, updating preliminary data published earlier in 2014.
Located in Publications
Highlight Car and van makers continue to meet CO2 emission targets ahead of schedule
Almost all car and van manufacturers have met European carbon dioxide emission limits several years ahead of their deadlines, according to updated information from the European Environment Agency (EEA).
Located in News
File Capturing Carbon: A new front in the fight against climate change
Global warming is one of the biggest issues of our time. To meet the targets set for reducing CO2 emissions, it's widely accepted that new technology will play an important role, sometimes as a "bridging technology", while alternative sustainable energy sources are being developed. One of the most promising technologies is Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS). This a means of capturing CO2 from sources such as power plants, compressing the CO2 and storing it away safely in geological formations underground or under the seabed instead of releasing it into the atmosphere.
Located in Environmental topics Climate change Multimedia
File Energy and environment: democratisation of power
European Parliament - Joint Parliamentary Meeting on "Energy and Sustainable Development", presentation by Prof. Jacqueline McGlade, Executive Director, European Environment Agency. Strasbourg, November 20 2008.
Located in Environmental topics Energy Multimedia
Indicator Assessment chemical/x-pdb Ocean acidification
Surface-ocean pH has declined from 8.2 to 8.1 over the industrial era due to the growth of atmospheric CO 2 concentrations. This decline corresponds to a 30 % change in oceanic acidity. Observed reductions in surface-water pH are nearly identical across the global ocean and throughout Europe’s seas. Ocean acidification in recent decades is occurring a hundred times faster than during past natural events over the last 55 million years. Ocean acidification already reaches into the deep ocean, particularly in the high latitudes. Average surface-water pH is projected to decline further to 7.7 or 7.8 by the year 2100, depending on future CO 2 emissions. This decline represents a 100 to 150 % increase in acidity. Ocean acidification may affect many marine organisms within the next 20 years and could alter marine ecosystems and fisheries.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Ocean acidification
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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